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‘Worth the test?’ Pragmatism, pill testing and drug policy in Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Harm Reduction Journal, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 1,100)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
51 X users
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

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165 Mendeley
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Title
‘Worth the test?’ Pragmatism, pill testing and drug policy in Australia
Published in
Harm Reduction Journal, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12954-018-0216-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Groves

Abstract

Recent deaths of young Australian music festival attendees from 'party-drug' overdoses have sparked debate about the effectiveness of drug policies. Australia is widely lauded for its harm minimisation approach to drugs, and yet, over the last 30 years, it can be argued its policies have been fragmented, sometimes inconsistent and contradictory. The present article examines the root of this inconsistency, using it as a foundation to advocate for drug policy reform. In keeping with the goals of the National Drug Strategy to promote policy innovation, there is an opportunity to learn from international studies which have shown promising findings in the reduction of party-drug use and its harms through application of pill testing. This paper evaluates Australia's National Drug Strategy and pill testing through a lens of pragmatism, to determine whether there is space for testing practices in contemporary policy. Specifically, the paper analyses current drug policy literature and research studies, examining a range of key drug use indicators, social and political debate and research evidence. The need for policy reform, attitudinal and cultural shifts and development of stronger cross-sectoral partnerships is highlighted, to ensure a rational and logical approach that genuinely tackles drug policy-making and strategy from a broad public health perspective. Using a theoretical frame of pragmatism and drawing from national and international research evidence, this paper recommends the integration of pill testing into Australia's harm minimisation strategy.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 51 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 165 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 165 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 38 23%
Student > Master 25 15%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Postgraduate 7 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 4%
Other 14 8%
Unknown 56 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 13%
Social Sciences 21 13%
Psychology 19 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 11%
Arts and Humanities 6 4%
Other 24 15%
Unknown 56 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 179. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2023.
All research outputs
#222,506
of 25,253,876 outputs
Outputs from Harm Reduction Journal
#36
of 1,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,121
of 335,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Harm Reduction Journal
#2
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,253,876 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,100 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 335,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.