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Chronic hepatitis B virus infection and occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis)

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, February 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Chronic hepatitis B virus infection and occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis)
Published in
Virology Journal, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12985-015-0256-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chun Yang, Ping Ruan, Chao Ou, Jianjia Su, Ji Cao, Chengpiao Luo, Yanping Tang, Qi Wang, Hong Qin, Wen Sun, Yuan Li

Abstract

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been believed as a major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for a long time, however, the evidences of which are mostly from clinical and epidemiological investigations while there is no evidence from animal experiments. Tree shrew (Tupaia) is a small animal closely related to primates evolutionarily, with about 8 years of lifespan. Our previous study proved that tree shrews can be chronically HBV-infected after being inoculated neonatally with HBV. The present study reports the further results from the longer-term observation of these animals. Neonatal tree shrews were inoculated with sera from HBV-infected patient or tree shrew. Their serum samples and liver biopsies were collected periodically for detection of HBV markers as well as for histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Group A consisted of six tree shrews with chronic HBV-infection, and group B consisted of nine tree shrews without chronic HBV infection. Periodical examinations on serum and liver biopsies of the animals in group A showed the progress of HBV infection, and two cases of HCC occurred at their late stage of life. The courses of HBV infection and the hepatic histopathological and immunohistochemical changes in the tree shrews were similar to those in humans. In contrast, neither HCC nor obvious hepatitis histopathological change was found among the tree shrews in group B. The course of HBV infection and the features of HCC discovered in tree shrews are similar to those of chronically HBV-infected humans. The tree shrew model might be used to investigate the underlying mechanisms favoring susceptibility for chronic HBV infection and disease progression.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 6 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 6 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2015.
All research outputs
#2,402,442
of 9,370,416 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#380
of 1,830 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,931
of 252,257 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#23
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,370,416 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,830 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 252,257 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.