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Agreement between parent and child report of physical activity, sedentary and dietary behaviours in 9-12-year-old children and associations with children’s weight status

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychology, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)

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1 blog
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5 tweeters

Citations

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28 Dimensions

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75 Mendeley
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Title
Agreement between parent and child report of physical activity, sedentary and dietary behaviours in 9-12-year-old children and associations with children’s weight status
Published in
BMC Psychology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40359-018-0227-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maaike Koning, Astrid de Jong, Elske de Jong, Tommy L. S. Visscher, Jacob C. Seidell, Carry M. Renders

Abstract

To date, population based surveys aimed at gaining insight in health related behaviour of children have often used either child self-reports or parent proxy reports. It remains unclear however, if surveys using different sources of information from either parents or children are comparable. In addition, (over)weight status of children can lead to under- and over reporting by parents and children as a result of social desirability bias. We aimed at gaining insight in the level of agreement between parents and child reports regarding aspects of certain dietary, physical activity and sedentary behaviours, and whether there are differences in agreement between parents and child reports in healthy-weight and overweight children. Weighted kappa was used to determine the level of agreement between child and parent reports on health-related behaviour in 1998 parent-child dyads. We also stratified for weight status of the children. Information on children's health related behaviours was obtained by parental and children's questionnaires, and children's height and weight were measured. Associations between children's weight status and children reporting less, reporting more and reporting the same amount of health behaviour as their parents were investigated with multinomial logistic regression analysis. The Cohen's kappa coefficients ranged from almost perfect agreement for the variable means of transportation, fair for the variables breakfast consumption and frequency of outside play to slight for the variables duration of outside play, frequency and duration of TV/DVD viewing and family dinner. Overweight children were significantly more likely to report less breakfast consumption (OR = 2.6 (95% CI: 1.3 - 5.1)) and lower frequency of outside play than their parents (OR = 1.8 (95% CI: 1.1 - 2.9)). There can be considerable disagreement between the health related behaviours of children as reported by parents or the children themselves. Based on the present study, it cannot be concluded whether parents' or children's reports are more accurate. For future studies, social desirability and recall bias would be best demonstrated in a validation study comparing child and parent self-reports with more objective measures of physical activity and food intake.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 75 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 13%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 9%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 23 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 12%
Sports and Recreations 8 11%
Social Sciences 7 9%
Psychology 3 4%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 26 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 April 2018.
All research outputs
#1,760,373
of 15,922,732 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychology
#97
of 385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,635
of 281,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,732 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 385 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,433 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them