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Building capacity without disrupting health services: public health education for Africa through distance learning

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, April 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
76 Mendeley
citeulike
6 CiteULike
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Title
Building capacity without disrupting health services: public health education for Africa through distance learning
Published in
Human Resources for Health, April 2009
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-7-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucy Alexander, Ehi Uche Igumbor, David Sanders

Abstract

The human resources crisis in Africa is especially acute in the public health field. Through distance education, the School of Public Health of the University of the Western Cape, South Africa, has provided access to master's level public health education for health professionals from more than 20 African countries while they remain in post. Since 2000, interest has increased overwhelmingly to a point where four times more applications are received than can be accommodated. This home-grown programme remains sensitive to the needs of the target learners while engaging them in high-quality learning applied in their own work contexts. This brief paper describes the innovative aspects of the programme, offering some evaluative indications of its impact, and reviews how the delivery of text-led distance learning has facilitated the realization of the objectives of public health training. Strategies are proposed for scaling up such a programme to meet the growing need in this essential area of health human resource capacity development in Africa.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
India 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 71 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 22%
Researcher 12 16%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 6 8%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 22 29%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 34%
Social Sciences 12 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 10 13%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2018.
All research outputs
#2,661,810
of 14,711,297 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#369
of 820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,506
of 324,605 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,711,297 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 324,605 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them