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Operationalizing atypical gaze in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: a cohesion-based approach

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, April 2018
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Title
Operationalizing atypical gaze in toddlers with autism spectrum disorders: a cohesion-based approach
Published in
Molecular Autism, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13229-018-0211-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Quan Wang, Daniel J. Campbell, Suzanne L. Macari, Katarzyna Chawarska, Frederick Shic

Abstract

Multiple eye-tracking studies have highlighted the "atypical" nature of social attention in autism. However, it is unclear how "atypical" or "typical" should be quantified. We developed a method for identifying moments when members of a group looked at similar places (High-Cohesion Time Frames; HCTFs). We defined typicality as the proximity of gaze points to typically developing (TD) gaze points during TD HCTFs. Comparing toddlers with ASD (n = 112) to developmentally delayed (DD, n = 36) and TD (n = 163) toddlers during a video with Dyadic Bid, Sandwich-Making, Joint Attention, and Animated Toys conditions, we examined (a) individual typicality scores, (b) the relationship between typicality and symptom severity, and (c) HCTF distributions associated with each diagnostic group. The ASD group had lower gaze typicality scores compared to the TD and DD groups in the Dyadic Bid and Sandwich-Making conditions but not during Animated Toys. The DD and TD groups did not differ in any condition. Correlational analyses indicated that higher typicality scores were associated with increased looking at pre-planned locations of the scene indexed by each experimental condition. In the ASD group, lower gaze typicality was associated with more severe autism symptoms. Examining ASD HCTFs, the gaze of toddlers with ASD was least cohesive during Dyadic Bid and most cohesive during Animated Toys. In contrast to non-ASD groups, toddlers with ASD show high cohesion during salient nonsocial events, suggesting that consistency in looking strategies may depend more on perceptual features. These findings are consequential for understanding individual differences in visual attention in ASD and for the design of more sensitive biomarker tasks for stratification, between-group differentiation, and measuring response to treatment.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 18%
Researcher 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 7%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 25 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Neuroscience 3 4%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 19 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2018.
All research outputs
#10,225,832
of 12,802,184 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#385
of 407 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#207,011
of 274,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#5
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,802,184 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 407 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.0. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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