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Simian malaria in the Brazilian Atlantic forest: first description of natural infection of capuchin monkeys (Cebinae subfamily) by Plasmodium simium

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2015
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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37 Dimensions

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87 Mendeley
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Title
Simian malaria in the Brazilian Atlantic forest: first description of natural infection of capuchin monkeys (Cebinae subfamily) by Plasmodium simium
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0606-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Denise Anete Madureira de Alvarenga, Anielle de Pina-Costa, Taís Nóbrega de Sousa, Alcides Pissinatti, Mariano G Zalis, Martha C Suaréz-Mutis, Ricardo Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Patrícia Brasil, Cláudio Tadeu Daniel-Ribeiro, Cristiana Ferreira Alves de Brito

Abstract

In Brazil, two species of Plasmodium have been described infecting non-human primates, Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. These species are morphologically, genetically and immunologically indistinguishable from the human Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax parasites, respectively. Plasmodium simium has been observed naturally infecting monkeys of the genera Alouatta and Brachyteles in a restricted area of the Atlantic Forest in the south and southeast regions of Brazil. However, its reported geographical distribution and the diversity of its vertebrate hosts may be underestimated, since available data were largely based on analyses by microscopic examination of peripheral blood, a method with limited sensitivity, considering the potential sub-patent feature of these infections. The present study describes, for the first time, the natural infection of P. simium in capuchin monkeys from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Kenya 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 83 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Researcher 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 14 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 6%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 19 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2015.
All research outputs
#14,812,533
of 19,211,930 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#4,338
of 5,074 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,868
of 226,510 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,211,930 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,074 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,510 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them