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The impact of a healthy lifestyle on Disability-Adjusted Life Years: a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of a healthy lifestyle on Disability-Adjusted Life Years: a prospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Medicine, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0287-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne M May, Ellen A Struijk, Heidi P Fransen, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, G Ardine de Wit, Jolanda MA Boer, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Jeljer Hoekstra, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Petra HM Peeters, Joline WJ Beulens

Abstract

The association between single health behaviours and incidence of and premature mortality from major chronic diseases, including myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and cancer, has been demonstrated thoroughly. However, the association of several healthy behaviours with Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs), which is a measure for total health combining Years Lost due to Disability and the Years of Life Lost due to premature mortality, has not been studied yet. A prospective cohort study was conducted among 33,066 healthy men and women aged 20 to 70 years recruited into the EPIC-NL study during 1993 to 1997. Participants' smoking status, BMI, physical activity, and adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet (excluding alcohol) were investigated separately and combined into a simple health behaviour score ranging from 0 to 4. Participants were followed until the end of 2007 for occurrence of and mortality from the most important chronic diseases. The association between lifestyle (separate lifestyle factors and a simple health behaviour score) and DALYs were adjusted for relevant confounders. After a median follow-up of 12.4 years, 6,647 disease incidences and 1,482 deaths were documented. Non-smoking, low BMI (BMI <25), being physically active, and adherence to a Mediterranean diet were all associated with a significantly lower disease burden. Persons adhering to all four healthy lifestyle characteristics lived a minimum of 2 years longer in good health (DALYs: -2.13; 95% CI: -2.65 to -1.62) than persons with none. Due to our non-extinct cohort, the total number of DALYs, and consequently the estimates, is underestimated. Therefore, true lifetime health benefits of a healthy lifestyle will be even larger. Non-smoking, a low BMI, being physically active, and adherence to a Mediterranean diet were associated with a lower disease burden. Each additional healthy lifestyle factor contributed to a longer life in good health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 144 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 17%
Researcher 23 16%
Student > Bachelor 22 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 13 9%
Unknown 38 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 10%
Psychology 13 9%
Social Sciences 10 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 4%
Other 21 14%
Unknown 44 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,814,438
of 21,239,792 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,660
of 3,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,324
of 230,345 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,239,792 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,115 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.9. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,345 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them