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HIV-free survival according to the early infant-feeding practices; a retrospective study in an anti-retroviral therapy programme in Makurdi, Nigeria

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
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Title
HIV-free survival according to the early infant-feeding practices; a retrospective study in an anti-retroviral therapy programme in Makurdi, Nigeria
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0871-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emmanuel A Anígilájé, Othniel J Dabit, Ayodotun Olutola, Bem Ageda, Sunday A Aderibigbe

Abstract

In Nigeria, reports of the outcomes of prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) interventions had been limited to the MTCT rates of HIV, with no information on HIV-free survival (HFS) in the HIV-exposed infants over time. A retrospective study between June 2008 and December 2011 at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Nigeria comparing HFS rates at 3 and 18 months according to the infant feeding pattern at the 6th week of life. HFS was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and association of maternal and infant variables and risk of HIV acquisition or death was tested in a Cox regression analysis. 801 HIV uninfected infants at 6 weeks of life were studied in accordance with their reported cumulative feeding pattern. This includes 196 infants on exclusive breast feeding (EBF); 544 on exclusive breast milk substitute (EBMS) feeding and 61 on mixed feeding (MF). The overall HFS was 94.4% at 3 months and this declined significantly to 87.1% at the 18 months of age (p-value = 0.000). The infants on MF had the lowest HFS rates of 75.7% at 3 months and 69.8% at 18 months. The HFS rate for infants on EBF was 97.4% at 3 months and 92.5% at 18 month whilst infants on EBMS had HFS of 99.1% at 3 months and 86.2% at 18 months. A higher and significant drop off in HFS at the two time points occurred between infants on EBMS (12.9%) compared to infants on EBF (4.9%), p-value of 0.002, but not between infants on MF (5.9%) and EBMS, p-value of 0.114 and those on MF and EBF, p-value of 0.758. In Cox regression multivariate analyses; MF, gestational age of ˂ 37 weeks, and a high pre-delivery maternal viral load were consistently associated with HIV infection or death at 3 months and 18 months (p ˂0.05). For a better HFS in our setting; MF must be avoided, efforts to deliver babies at term in mothers with reduced viral load are advocated and EBF must be promoted as the safest and the most feasible mode of infant-feeding.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 103 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 21%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 22 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 16%
Social Sciences 6 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 22 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2015.
All research outputs
#3,459,156
of 4,888,304 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,911
of 2,628 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,489
of 152,140 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#90
of 141 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 2,628 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 141 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.