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Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of benzimidazole resistance in the ovine parasite Nematodirus battus

Overview of attention for article published in Veterinary Research, December 2014
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Title
Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of benzimidazole resistance in the ovine parasite Nematodirus battus
Published in
Veterinary Research, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s13567-014-0116-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alison A Morrison, Sian Mitchell, Rebecca Mearns, Iain Richards, Jacqui B Matthews, David J Bartley

Abstract

Benzimidazole resistance is common amongst many ovine trichostrongylid nematodes species globally. Although anthelmintics have been used for over half a century in some areas of the world for the control of Nematodirus battus, resistance has never been detected. Veterinary investigations conducted in 2010 demonstrated reduced efficacy in a flock that had been treated previously with fenbendazole (FBZ), suggesting probable resistance in N. battus. Infective larvae (L3; designated MNba2) were generated from the original material to conduct a controlled efficacy test (CET). Faecal egg counts showed an average of 37% reduction in the FBZ treated group 7 days post treatment compared to the untreated lambs. Average worm burden results showed no reduction after FBZ treatment compared to the untreated group (3850 and 3850 worms respectively). A molecular assay to assess the frequency of the commonly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the ß-tubulin isotype 1 gene, F200Y and E198A, was developed. Larval genotypes were predominantly homozygous resistant at codon 200 SNP, ranging from 56%-83% and remained stable at 70% for adult worm populations taken from treated and control lambs in the CET. Only susceptible genotypes were found at codon 198. The allele frequency for F200Y ranged between 80-83% in adult worms taken from the CET from treated and control lambs. The results confirmed initial findings and demonstrated the first report of FBZ resistance in N. battus whilst providing evidence that the P200 point mutation in the ß-tubulin isotype 1 gene is a potential mechanism of resistance in the species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 30%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 10 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2016.
All research outputs
#11,372,747
of 12,786,466 outputs
Outputs from Veterinary Research
#744
of 804 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,049
of 219,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Veterinary Research
#3
of 3 outputs
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