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Medical specialty selection criteria of Israeli medical students early in their clinical experience: subgroups

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, April 2018
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Title
Medical specialty selection criteria of Israeli medical students early in their clinical experience: subgroups
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13584-018-0215-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander Avidan, Charles Weissman, Uriel Elchalal, Howard Tandeter, Rachel Yaffa Zisk-Rony

Abstract

Israeli medical school classes include a number of student subgroups. Therefore, interventions aimed at recruiting medical students to the various specialties should to be tailored to each subgroup. Questionnaires, distributed to 6 consecutive 5th-year classes of the Hebrew University - Hadassah School of Medicine, elicited information on criteria for choosing a career specialty, criteria for choosing a residency program and the importance of finding a specialty interesting and challenging when choosing a residency. Completed questionnaires were returned by 540 of 769 (70%) students. The decision processes for choosing a medical specialty and choosing a residency program were different. Family and colleagues had minimal influence on choosing a specialty, while family and their residential locality had much influence on choosing a residency, especially among women. Older age, marriage, and spousal influence were positively associated with choice of a specialty. Two-thirds of the students had completed military service, 20% were attending medical school prior to military service, 5% had completed national service and 9% had entered medical school without serving. Despite the pre-military subgroup being younger and having another 7 years of medical school, internship and military service before residency, they had begun thinking about which specialty to choose, just like the post-military students. When choosing a residency program, post-military women were more influenced by their families and family residential locality than their pre-military counterparts; differences ascribed to the older and often married post-military women having or wanting to begin families. This difference was reinforced by fewer post- than pre-military women willing to wait 2-3 years for a residency in the specialty that interested them most and were willing to begin residency immediately after internship in a specialty that interested them less. Medical school classes are composed of various subgroups, each with its own characteristics. It is important to differentiate between choosing a specialty and a residency program. Choosing a specialty is a uniquely personal decision with some spousal influence among married students. It is of central importance even among pre-military students not slated to begin residency for many years. In contrast, choosing a residency program is influenced by family, where one grew up and other family-related considerations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 16%
Student > Master 3 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 53%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 26%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2018.
All research outputs
#11,396,418
of 12,818,993 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#243
of 341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,488
of 270,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#1
of 1 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 341 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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