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The Belgian commitment to pharmaceutical quality: a model policy to improve quality assurance of medicines available through humanitarian and development programs

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
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Title
The Belgian commitment to pharmaceutical quality: a model policy to improve quality assurance of medicines available through humanitarian and development programs
Published in
Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40545-018-0136-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raffaella Ravinetto, Tim Roosen, Catherine Dujardin

Abstract

Today, a combination of globalization of pharmaceutical production, lack of regulatory harmonization, and weakness of Medicines Regulatory Authorities, creates the "perfect conditions" for poor-quality medicine to circulate in the global market and to penetrate the less-regulated countries. Medicines regulation is the responsibility of the national regulatory authorities in the recipient country, but in the poorer countries, in practice, the responsibility of supply of quality-assured medicines is often taken by Non-Governmental Organizations and other implementers. But with some notable exceptions, many donors lack a pharmaceutical procurement policy with adequate quality requirements; and many implementers lack the skills and expertise needed to orient themselves in the complex web of global pharmaceutical supply. Thus, patients served by humanitarian or development programs may remain exposed to the risk of poor-quality medicines. When public money is used to purchase medicines for medical programs to be carried out overseas, adequate policies should be in place to assure that the same quality requirements are set that would be required for medicines marketed in the "donor" country. We will describe here a policy recently adopted in Belgium, i.e. the "Commitment to Quality Assurance for Pharmaceutical Products", signed in October 2017 by the Vice Prime Minister and Minister for Development Cooperation and 19 Belgian implementing agencies. By signing the new policy, the counterparts committed to ensure quality of medicines in the programs funded by Belgium's Official Development Assistance, and to build quality-assurance capacity in the recipient countries. Implementers are requested to integrate in their financing applications a section for pharmaceutical quality assurance, with a justified budget. They are also invited to consider how costs could be rationalized and mutualized by aligning the strengths of the various implementers. This model policy has the potential to be considered for adoption by other donors, to help to reduce the current multiple standards in pharmaceutical quality, and to contribute to protect vulnerable communities from the plague of poor-quality medicines. The online version of this article (10.1186/s40545-018-0136-z) contains an additional file, which is available to authorized users.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 25%
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Other 2 6%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 5 14%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 14%
Social Sciences 5 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 8%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 9 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 April 2018.
All research outputs
#5,610,876
of 21,044,876 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#120
of 372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#96,561
of 295,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmaceutical Policy and Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,044,876 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 372 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,723 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them