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Reduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa sputum density during a cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbation does not predict clinical response

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

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6 tweeters
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Citations

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Reduction in Pseudomonas aeruginosa sputum density during a cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbation does not predict clinical response
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0856-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

John C Lam, Ranjani Somayaji, Michael G Surette, Harvey R Rabin, Michael D Parkins

Abstract

Pulmonary exacerbations (PEx) are critical events in cystic fibrosis (CF), responsible for reduced quality of life and permanent loss of lung function. Approximately 1/4 of PEx are associated with failure to recover lung function and/or resolve symptoms. Developing tools to optimize PEx treatment is of paramount importance. We retrospectively audited all adults infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, experiencing PEx necessitating parenteral antibiotic therapy from 2006-2012 from our center. Quantitative analysis of sputum at admission, twice-weekly during hospitalization, and end of therapy were compared to baseline (most recent healthy) and follow-up (after PEx) samples. Change in P. aeruginosa burden from baseline was assessed for any and all morphotypes (ALL), as well as mucoid (MUC) and non-mucoid (NON) isolates specifically. PEx were identified as failures if >90% of baseline pulmonary function was not recovered. Forty-six patients meeting the above inclusion and exclusion criteria experienced 144 PEx during this time (median 3, IQR 2-6). Patients were treated for a median 14 days (IQR 13-16). No increase in ALL, MUC or NON were detected at PEx, nor was there an association between change in sputum density and magnitude of lung function decline. PEx failures were observed in 30% of events. Reductions of at least 1-log and 2 log P. aeruginosa sputum density was observed in 57% and 46% (ALL), 73% and 55% (MUC) and 58% and 46% (NON) of PEx, respectively. Factors associated with greater reduction of P. aeruginosa sputum density included choice of β-lactam antibiotic, antibiotics with in vitro predicted activity and treatment duration. PEx associated with reductions in P. aeruginosa sputum density were not associated with a reduced risk of PEx failure. Enhanced killing of P. aeruginosa during PEx does not predict improved clinical outcomes. Studies accounting for the polymicrobial nature of CF respiratory disease and the heterogeneity of P. aeruginosa causing chronic infection may enable the identification of a more appropriate pathogen(s) based biomarker of PEx outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 4%
Australia 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 50 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 19%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 4%
Other 9 17%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 May 2018.
All research outputs
#4,350,998
of 14,977,987 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,386
of 5,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,462
of 224,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,977,987 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,521 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,673 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them