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Molecular mechanism of diabetic cardiomyopathy and modulation of microRNA function by synthetic oligonucleotides

Overview of attention for article published in Cardiovascular Diabetology, March 2018
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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45 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Molecular mechanism of diabetic cardiomyopathy and modulation of microRNA function by synthetic oligonucleotides
Published in
Cardiovascular Diabetology, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12933-018-0684-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nilanjan Ghosh, Rajesh Katare

Abstract

Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a chronic complication in individuals with diabetes and is characterized by ventricular dilation and hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, decreased or preserved systolic function and reduced ejection fraction eventually resulting in heart failure. Despite being well characterized, the fundamental mechanisms leading to DCM are still elusive. Recent studies identified the involvement of small non-coding small RNA molecules such as microRNAs (miRs) playing a key role in the etiology of DCM. Therefore, miRs associated with DCM represents a new class of targets for the development of mechanistic therapeutics, which may yield marked benefits compared to other therapeutic approaches. Indeed, few miRs currently under active clinical investigation, with many expressing cautious optimism that miRs based therapies will succeed in the coming years. The major caution in using miRs based therapy is the need to improve the stability and specificity following systemic injection, which can be achieved through chemical and structural modification. In this review, we first discuss the established role of miRs in DCM and the advances in miRs based therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of DCM. We next discuss the currently employed chemical modification of miR oligonucleotides and their utility in therapies specifically focusing on the DCM. Finally, we summarize the commonly used delivery system and approaches for assessment of miRNA modulation and potential off-target effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 20 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 8 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Neuroscience 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 23 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2019.
All research outputs
#14,980,451
of 23,043,346 outputs
Outputs from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#807
of 1,405 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#201,100
of 332,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cardiovascular Diabetology
#20
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,043,346 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,405 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.