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Fishers’ knowledge about fish trophic interactions in the southeastern Brazilian coast

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, March 2015
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2 tweeters

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20 Dimensions

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112 Mendeley
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Title
Fishers’ knowledge about fish trophic interactions in the southeastern Brazilian coast
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0012-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Milena Ramires, Mariana Clauzet, Walter Barrella, Matheus M Rotundo, Renato AM Silvano, Alpina Begossi

Abstract

Data derived from studies of fishers' local ecological knowledge (LEK) can be invaluable to the proposal of new studies and more appropriate management strategies. This study analyzed the fisher's LEK about trophic relationships of fishes in the southeastern Brazilian coast, comparing fishers' LEK with scientific knowledge to provide new hypotheses. The initial contacts with fishers were made through informal visits in their residences, to explain the research goals, meet fishers and their families, check the number of resident fishers and ask for fishers' consent to participate in the research. After this initial contact, fishers were selected to be included in the interviews through the technique of snowball sampling. The fishers indicated by others who attended the criteria to be included in the research were interviewed by using a semi-structured standard questionnaire. There were interviewed 26 artisanal fishers from three communities of the Ilhabela: Jabaquara, Fome and Serraria. The interviewed fishers showed a detailed knowledge about the trophic interactions of the studied coastal fishes, as fishers mentioned 17 food items for these fishes and six fish and three mammals as fish predators. The most mentioned food items were small fish, shrimps and crabs, while the most mentioned predators were large reef fishes. Fishers also mentioned some predators, such as sea otters, that have not been reported by the biological literature and are poorly known. The LEK of the studied fishers showed a high degree of concordance with the scientific literature regarding fish diet. This study evidenced the value of fishers' LEK to improve fisheries research and management, as well as the needy to increase the collaboration among managers, biologists and fishers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Australia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 108 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 19%
Student > Master 20 18%
Researcher 15 13%
Professor 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 25 22%
Unknown 15 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 42 38%
Environmental Science 25 22%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 <1%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 23 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2015.
All research outputs
#6,963,646
of 11,234,828 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#387
of 538 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,540
of 208,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#14
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,234,828 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 538 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.