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The competition between simple and complex evolutionary trajectories in asexual populations

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
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Title
The competition between simple and complex evolutionary trajectories in asexual populations
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0334-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ian E Ochs, Michael M Desai

Abstract

On rugged fitness landscapes where sign epistasis is common, adaptation can often involve either individually beneficial "uphill" mutations or more complex mutational trajectories involving fitness valleys or plateaus. The dynamics of the evolutionary process determine the probability that evolution will take any specific path among a variety of competing possible trajectories. Understanding this evolutionary choice is essential if we are to understand the outcomes and predictability of adaptation on rugged landscapes. We present a simple model to analyze the probability that evolution will eschew immediately uphill paths in favor of crossing fitness valleys or plateaus that lead to higher fitness but less accessible genotypes. We calculate how this probability depends on the population size, mutation rates, and relevant selection pressures, and compare our analytical results to Wright-Fisher simulations. We find that the probability of valley crossing depends nonmonotonically on population size: intermediate size populations are most likely to follow a "greedy" strategy of acquiring immediately beneficial mutations even if they lead to evolutionary dead ends, while larger and smaller populations are more likely to cross fitness valleys to reach distant advantageous genotypes. We explicitly identify the boundaries between these different regimes in terms of the relevant evolutionary parameters. Above a certain threshold population size, we show that the probability that the population finds the more distant peak depends only on a single simple combination of the relevant parameters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 3 6%
United States 2 4%
Norway 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Estonia 1 2%
France 1 2%
Japan 1 2%
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 42 79%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 26%
Researcher 11 21%
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Professor 4 8%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 1 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Physics and Astronomy 4 8%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Neuroscience 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2015.
All research outputs
#1,704,043
of 14,573,111 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#590
of 2,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,722
of 223,556 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,573,111 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,637 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,556 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them