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Larval transcriptomic response to host plants in two related phytophagous lepidopteran species: implications for host specialization and species divergence

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, April 2018
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Title
Larval transcriptomic response to host plants in two related phytophagous lepidopteran species: implications for host specialization and species divergence
Published in
BMC Genomics, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4589-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Orsucci, P. Audiot, F. Dorkeld, A. Pommier, M. Vabre, B. Gschloessl, S. Rialle, D. Severac, D. Bourguet, R. Streiff

Abstract

Most phytophagous insects have morphological, behavioral and physiological adaptations allowing them to specialize on one or a few plant species. Identifying the mechanisms involved in host plant specialization is crucial to understand the role of divergent selection between different environments in species diversification, and to identify sustainable targets for the management of insect pest species. In the present study, we measured larval phenotypic and transcriptomic responses to host plants in two related phytophagous lepidopteran species: the European corn borer (ECB), a worldwide pest of maize, and the adzuki bean borer (ABB), which feeds of various dicotyledons. Our aim was to identify the genes and functions underlying host specialization and/or divergence between ECB and ABB. At the phenotypic level, we observed contrasted patterns of survival, weight gain and developmental time between ECB and ABB, and within ECB and ABB reared on two different host plants. At the transcriptomic level, around 8% of the genes were differentially expressed (DE) between species and/or host plant. 70% of these DE genes displayed a divergent pattern of expression between ECB and ABB, regardless of the host, while the remaining 30% were involved in the plastic response between hosts. We further categorized plastic DE genes according to their parallel or opposite pattern between ECB and ABB to specifically identify candidate genes involved in the species divergence by host specialization. These candidates highlighted a comprehensive response, involving functions related to plant recognition, digestion, detoxification, immunity and development. Last, we detected viral, bacterial, and yeast genes whose incidence contrasted ECB and ABB samples, and maize and mugwort conditions. We suggest that these microorganism communities might influence the survival, metabolism and defense patterns observed in ECB and ABB larvae. The comprehensive approach developed in the present study allowed to identify phenotypic specialization patterns and underlying candidate molecular mechanisms, and highlighted the putative role of microorganisms in the insect-host plant interaction. These findings offer the opportunity to pinpoint specific and sustainable molecular or physiological targets for the regulation of ECB pest populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Master 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 7 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 23%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 9 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2018.
All research outputs
#17,945,904
of 23,043,346 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#7,612
of 10,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#237,599
of 327,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#165
of 235 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,043,346 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,697 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 235 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.