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The inhibitory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on blood–brain barrier disruption following intracerebral hemorrhage in rats: contribution of TSG-6

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, April 2015
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Title
The inhibitory effect of mesenchymal stem cell on blood–brain barrier disruption following intracerebral hemorrhage in rats: contribution of TSG-6
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12974-015-0284-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Min Chen, Xifeng Li, Xin Zhang, Xuying He, Lingfeng Lai, Yanchao Liu, Guohui Zhu, Wei Li, Hui Li, Qinrui Fang, Zequn Wang, Chuanzhi Duan

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are well known having beneficial effects on intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in previous studies. The therapeutic mechanisms are mainly to investigate proliferation, differentiation, and immunomodulation. However, few studies have used MSCs to treat blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage after ICH. The influence of MSCs on the BBB and its related mechanisms were investigated when MSCs were transplanted into rat ICH model in this study. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham-operated group, PBS-treated (ICH + PBS) group, and MSC-treated (ICH + MSC) group. ICH was induced by injection of IV collagenase into the rats' brains. MSCs were transplanted intravenously into the rats 2 h after ICH induction in MSC-treated group. The following factors were compared: inflammation, apoptosis, behavioral changes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), endothelial integrity, brain edema content, BBB leakage, TNF-α stimulated gene/protein 6 (TSG-6), and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. In the ICH + MSC group, MSCs decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis, downregulated the density of microglia/macrophages and neutrophil infiltration at the ICH site, reduced the levels of iNOS and MMP-9, attenuated ONOO(-) formation, and increased the levels of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-5. MSCs also improved the degree of brain edema and BBB leakage. The protective effect of MSCs on the BBB in ICH rats was possibly invoked by increased expression of TSG-6, which may have suppressed activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The levels of iNOS and ONOO(-), which played an important role in BBB disruption, decreased due to the inhibitory effects of TSG-6 on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Our results demonstrated that intravenous transplantation of MSCs decreased the levels of ONOO(-) and degree of BBB leakage and improved neurological recovery in a rat ICH model. This strategy may provide a new insight for future therapies that aim to prevent breakdown of the BBB in patients with ICH and eventually offer therapeutic options for ICH.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 42 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Master 7 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 18%
Neuroscience 6 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2015.
All research outputs
#11,121,429
of 14,629,909 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1,174
of 1,750 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,543
of 223,840 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,629,909 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,750 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,840 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.