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Childbirth experience questionnaire: validating its use in the United Kingdom

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
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Title
Childbirth experience questionnaire: validating its use in the United Kingdom
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12884-015-0513-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kate F Walker, Philippa Wilson, George J Bugg, Anna Dencker, Jim G Thornton

Abstract

The Childbirth Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) was developed in Sweden in 2010 and validated in 920 primiparous women. It has not been validated in the United Kingdom (UK). Measuring the impact of an intervention on a woman's childbirth experience is arguably as important as measuring its impact on outcomes such as caesarean delivery and perinatal morbidity or mortality and yet surprisingly it is rarely done. The lack of a robust validated tool for evaluating labour experience in the UK is a topical issue in the UK at present. Indeed NICE say 'A standardised method to measure and quantify women's psychological and emotional wellbeing and their birth experiences is urgently required to support any study investigating the effectiveness of interventions, techniques or strategies during birth.' The Childbirth Experience Questionnaire and part of the Care Quality Commission Maternity Survey (2010) was sent to 350 women at one month postnatal. The CEQ was sent again two weeks later. The CEQ was tested for face validity among 25 postnatal mothers. Demographic data and delivery data was used to establish construct validity of the CEQ using the method of known-groups validation. The results of the scored CEQ sent out twice were used to measure test-retest reliability of the CEQ by calculating the quadratic weighted index of agreement between the two scores. Criterion validity was measured by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient for the CEQ and Maternity Survey scores. Face validity of the CEQ in a UK population was demonstrated with all respondents stating it was easy to understand and complete. A statistically significantly higher CEQ score for subgroups of women known to report a better birth outcome demonstrated construct validity of the CEQ. A weighted kappa of 0.68 demonstrated test-retest reliability of the CEQ. A Pearson correlation co-efficient of 0.73 demonstrated a strong correlation between the results of the CEQ and the results of the 'gold standard' assessment of childbirth experience in the UK: the Maternity Survey and hence criterion validity of the CEQ. The Childbirth Experience Questionnaire is a valid and reliable measure of childbirth experience in the UK population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 122 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 24%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 8%
Researcher 10 8%
Other 29 23%
Unknown 21 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 23%
Psychology 16 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 28 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,200,178
of 5,493,570 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#701
of 1,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,667
of 159,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#27
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,493,570 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 59th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,339 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.