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Incidence of depression, anxiety and stress following traumatic injury: a longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, March 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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63 Dimensions

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119 Mendeley
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Title
Incidence of depression, anxiety and stress following traumatic injury: a longitudinal study
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13049-015-0109-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Taneal A Wiseman, Kate Curtis, Mary Lam, Kim Foster

Abstract

Traumatic injury and mental health disorders are co-associated. Early identification of depression, anxiety and stress following injury, and subsequent preventive intervention, may reduce the long-term symptoms and negative impacts associated with depression and anxiety. The purpose of the study was to determine the incidence, severity and predictors of depression, anxiety and stress in injured patients in the acute phase of care, and at six months following injury, as well as the effectiveness of an in-hospital screening tool. This descriptive longitudinal study of trauma patients was conducted at a Level 1 Metropolitan Trauma Centre in Australia over 14 months. Participants were interviewed using the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale short-form version (DASS-21) during hospital admission then at 3 and 6 months after injury. Descriptive statistics were performed to evaluate participant characteristics and incidence of depression, anxiety and stress. Correlations and logistic regression were conducted to investigate the ability of the DASS-21 to predict symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress and to investigate factors associated with depression, anxiety and stress 6 months after injury. 201 participants ranging in age (18-94 years) and injury severity participated in the baseline interview and 109 completed all 3 interviews over 6 months. Over half (54%) reported above normal scores for depression, anxiety and/or stress in at least one of the 3 time points. Intensive care unit admission and high levels of depression, anxiety and stress at 3 months post injury were predictors for high levels of depression, anxiety and stress at 6 months. Low scores for depression, anxiety and stress during admission were correlated with low scores for depression, anxiety and stress at 3 and 6 months. Depression, anxiety and stress in patients hospitalised following injury is common and should be anticipated in patients who have had an intensive care admission. Screening at 3 months following injury identifies patients at risk of long-term symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 119 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 118 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Researcher 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 34 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 19%
Psychology 19 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 14%
Arts and Humanities 4 3%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 15 13%
Unknown 38 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,322,115
of 6,857,289 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#356
of 518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,034
of 195,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#13
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,857,289 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 51st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 518 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 195,496 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.