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Long-term health effects of early life exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, April 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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21 Dimensions

Readers on

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85 Mendeley
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Title
Long-term health effects of early life exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water: a retrospective cohort study
Published in
Environmental Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12940-015-0021-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ann Aschengrau, Michael R Winter, Veronica M Vieira, Thomas F Webster, Patricia A Janulewicz, Lisa G Gallagher, Janice Weinberg, David M Ozonoff

Abstract

While adult exposure to PCE is known to have toxic effects, there is little information on the long-term impact of prenatal and early childhood exposure. We undertook a retrospective cohort study to examine the effects of their early life exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water. This retrospective cohort study examined whether prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water influenced the risk of a variety of chronic conditions among adults who were born between 1969 and 1983 in the Cape Cod area of Massachusetts. Eight hundred and thirty-one participants with prenatal and early childhood PCE exposure and 547 unexposed participants were studied. Individuals completed questionnaires to gather information on demographic characteristics, chronic conditions, and other sources of solvent exposure. The location of residences from birth through 1990 were used to estimate PCE exposure with U.S. EPA's water distribution system modeling software (EPANET) modified to incorporate a leaching and transport model. No associations were observed between early life PCE exposure and current occurrence of obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, color blindness, near- and far sightedness and dry eyes. In contrast, a 1.8-fold increased risk of cancer (95% CI: 0.8, 4.0) was seen among individuals with any early life exposure. These results were based on 31 participants (23 exposed and 8 unexposed) who reported cancers at a variety of anatomical sites, particularly the cervix. A 1.5-fold increase in the risk of epilepsy (95% CI: 0.6, 3.6, based on 16 exposed and 7 unexposed participants) was also observed among individuals with any early life exposure that was further increased to 1.8 (95% CI: 0.7, 4.6) among those with exposure at or above the sample median. These results suggest that the risk of epilepsy and certain types of cancer such as cervical cancer may be increased among adults who were exposed to PCE-contaminated drinking water exposure during gestation and early childhood. These findings should be interpreted cautiously because of the study limitations and confirmed in follow-up investigations of similarly exposed populations with medically-confirmed diagnoses. This relatively young study population should also be monitored periodically for subsequent changes in disease risk.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
Unknown 82 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 22%
Student > Bachelor 13 15%
Other 7 8%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 7%
Other 16 19%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 12%
Engineering 8 9%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Chemistry 3 4%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 22 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2019.
All research outputs
#5,643,883
of 20,568,640 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#711
of 1,415 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,049
of 240,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,568,640 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,415 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them