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Effect of a program of short bouts of exercise on bone health in adolescents involved in different sports: the PRO-BONE study protocol

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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237 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of a program of short bouts of exercise on bone health in adolescents involved in different sports: the PRO-BONE study protocol
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1633-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dimitris Vlachopoulos, Alan R Barker, Craig A Williams, Karen M Knapp, Brad S Metcalf, Luis Gracia-Marco

Abstract

Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease associated with high morbidity, mortality and increased economic costs. Early prevention during adolescence appears to be one of the most beneficial practices. Exercise is an effective approach for developing bone mass during puberty, but some sports may have a positive or negative impact on bone mass accrual. Plyometric jump training has been suggested as a type of exercise that can augment bone, but its effects on adolescent bone mass have not been rigorously assessed. The aims of the PRO-BONE study are to: 1) longitudinally assess bone health and its metabolism in adolescents engaged in osteogenic (football), non-osteogenic (cycling and swimming) sports and in a control group, and 2) examine the effect of a 9 month plyometric jump training programme on bone related outcomes in the sport groups. This study will recruit 105 males aged 12-14 years who have participated in sport specific training for at least 3 hours per week during the last 3 years in the following sports groups: football (n = 30), cycling (n = 30) and swimming (n = 30). An age-matched control group (n = 15) that does not engage in these sports more than 3 hours per week will also be recruited. Participants will be measured on 5 occasions: 1) at baseline; 2) after 12 months of sport specific training where each sport group will be randomly allocated into two sub-groups: intervention group (sport + plyometric jump training) and sport group (sport only); 3) exactly after the 9 months of intervention; 4) 6 months following the intervention; 5) 12 months following the intervention. Body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, air displacement plethysmography and bioelectrical impedance), bone stiffness index (ultrasounds), physical activity (accelerometers), diet (24 h recall questionnaire), pubertal maturation (Tanner stage), physical fitness (cardiorespiratory and muscular) and biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption will be measured at each visit. The PRO-BONE study is designed to investigate the impact of osteogenic and non-osteogenic sports on bone development in adolescent males during puberty, and how a plyometric jump training programme is associated with body composition parameters.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 237 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 233 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 52 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 14%
Student > Bachelor 34 14%
Researcher 19 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 5%
Other 39 16%
Unknown 46 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 66 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 42 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 21 9%
Social Sciences 13 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 3%
Other 20 8%
Unknown 69 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2019.
All research outputs
#8,402,087
of 15,923,161 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#6,471
of 10,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,572
of 231,116 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,923,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,957 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,116 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them