↓ Skip to main content

Cortisol and alpha-amylase as stress response indicators during pre-hospital emergency medicine training with repetitive high-fidelity simulation and scenarios with standardized patients

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Cortisol and alpha-amylase as stress response indicators during pre-hospital emergency medicine training with repetitive high-fidelity simulation and scenarios with standardized patients
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13049-015-0110-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bernd Valentin, Oliver Grottke, Max Skorning, Sebastian Bergrath, Harold Fischermann, Daniel Rörtgen, Marie-Therese Mennig, Christina Fitzner, Michael P Müller, Clemens Kirschbaum, Rolf Rossaint, Stefan K Beckers

Abstract

In emergency medicine, the benefits of high-fidelity simulation (SIM) are widely accepted and standardized patients (SP) are known to mimic real patients accurately. However, only limited data are available concerning physicians' stress markers within these training environments. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate repetitive stress among healthcare professionals in simulated pre-hospital emergency scenarios using either SIM or SPs. Teams with one emergency medical services (EMS) physician and two paramedics completed three SIM scenarios and two SP scenarios consecutively. To evaluate stress, salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase were measured in saliva samples taken before, during and after the scenarios. A total of 14 EMS physicians (29% female; mean age: 36.8 ± 5.0 years; mean duration of EMS-experience: 9.1 ± 5.8 years) and 27 paramedics (11% female; age: 30.9 ± 6.9 years; EMS experience: 8.1 ± 6.0 years) completed the study. Alpha-amylase and cortisol levels did not differ significantly between the two professions. Cortisol values showed a gradual and statistically significant reduction over time but little change was observed in response to each scenario. In contrast, alpha-amylase activity increased significantly in response to every SIM and SP scenario, but there was no clear trend towards an overall increase or decrease over time. Increases in salivary alpha-amylase activity suggest that both SIM and SP training produce stress among emergency healthcare professionals. Corresponding increases in salivary cortisol levels were not observed. Among physicians in the emergency setting, it appears that alpha-amylase provides a more sensitive measure of stress levels than cortisol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Unknown 92 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 16%
Researcher 12 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 11%
Other 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 9%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 22 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 11%
Psychology 10 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 6%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 24 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 April 2015.
All research outputs
#3,931,906
of 5,561,997 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#410
of 480 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,918
of 164,533 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#14
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,561,997 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 480 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,533 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.