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A statistical method for single sample analysis of HumanMethylation450 array data: genome-wide methylation analysis of patients with imprinting disorders

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, April 2015
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Title
A statistical method for single sample analysis of HumanMethylation450 array data: genome-wide methylation analysis of patients with imprinting disorders
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13148-015-0081-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Faisal I Rezwan, Louise E Docherty, Rebecca L Poole, Gabrielle A Lockett, S Hasan Arshad, John W Holloway, I Karen Temple, Deborah JG Mackay

Abstract

The Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip is an array-based technology for analysing DNA methylation at approximately 475,000 differentially methylated cytosines across the human genome. Hitherto, the array has been used for case-control studies, where sample numbers can be sufficient to yield statistically robust data on a genome-wide basis. We recently reported an informatic pipeline capable of yielding statistically and biologically significant results using only five cases, which expanded the use of this technology to rare disease studies. However, the clinical application of these technologies requires the ability to perform robust analysis of individual patients. Here we report a novel informatic approach for methylation array analysis of single samples, using the Crawford-Howell t-test. We tested our approach on patients with ultra-rare imprinting disorders with aberrant DNA methylation at multiple locations across the genome, which was previously detected by targeted testing. However, array analysis outperformed targeted assays in three ways: it detected loci not normally analysed by targeted testing, detected methylation changes too subtle to detect by the targeted testing and reported broad and consistent methylation changes across genetic loci not captured by point testing. This method has potential clinical utility for human disorders where DNA methylation change may be a biomarker of disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 45 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 11 23%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 15%
Computer Science 5 11%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2015.
All research outputs
#7,801,338
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#428
of 582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,537
of 224,506 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#19
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,506 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.