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Mutation signatures implicate aristolochic acid in bladder cancer development

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Medicine, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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78 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Mutation signatures implicate aristolochic acid in bladder cancer development
Published in
Genome Medicine, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13073-015-0161-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Song Ling Poon, Mi Ni Huang, Yang Choo, John R McPherson, Willie Yu, Hong Lee Heng, Anna Gan, Swe Swe Myint, Ee Yan Siew, Lian Dee Ler, Lay Guat Ng, Wen-Hui Weng, Cheng-Keng Chuang, John SP Yuen, See-Tong Pang, Patrick Tan, Bin Tean Teh, Steven G Rozen

Abstract

Aristolochic acid (AA) is a natural compound found in many plants of the Aristolochia genus, and these plants are widely used in traditional medicines for numerous conditions and for weight loss. Previous work has connected AA-mutagenesis to upper-tract urothelial cell carcinomas and hepatocellular carcinomas. We hypothesize that AA may also contribute to bladder cancer. Here, we investigated the involvement of AA-mutagenesis in bladder cancer by sequencing bladder tumor genomes from two patients with known exposure to AA. After detecting strong mutational signatures of AA exposure in these tumors, we exome-sequenced and analyzed an additional 11 bladder tumors and analyzed publicly available somatic mutation data from a further 336 bladder tumors. The somatic mutations in the bladder tumors from the two patients with known AA exposure showed overwhelming AA signatures. We also detected evidence of AA exposure in 1 out of 11 bladder tumors from Singapore and in 3 out of 99 bladder tumors from China. In addition, 1 out of 194 bladder tumors from North America showed a pattern of mutations that might have resulted from exposure to an unknown mutagen with a heretofore undescribed pattern of A > T mutations. Besides the signature of AA exposure, the bladder tumors also showed the CpG > TpG and activated-APOBEC signatures, which have been previously reported in bladder cancer. This study demonstrates the utility of inferring mutagenic exposures from somatic mutation spectra. Moreover, AA exposure in bladder cancer appears to be more pervasive in the East, where traditional herbal medicine is more widely used. More broadly, our results suggest that AA exposure is more extensive than previously thought both in terms of populations at risk and in terms of types of cancers involved. This appears to be an important public health issue that should be addressed by further investigation and by primary prevention through regulation and education. In addition to opportunities for primary prevention, knowledge of AA exposure would provide opportunities for secondary prevention in the form of intensified screening of patients with known or suspected AA exposure.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Unknown 74 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 20%
Researcher 15 20%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 7%
Professor 3 4%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 20 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 17 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2020.
All research outputs
#1,281,822
of 20,419,783 outputs
Outputs from Genome Medicine
#280
of 1,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,914
of 242,733 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,419,783 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,324 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,733 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them