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Paradoxical sleep deprivation impairs mouse survival after infection with malaria parasites

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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29 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Paradoxical sleep deprivation impairs mouse survival after infection with malaria parasites
Published in
Malaria Journal, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0690-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisandro Lungato, Marcos L Gazarini, Edgar J Paredes-Gamero, Sergio Tufik, Vânia D’Almeida

Abstract

Parasitic diseases like malaria are a major public health problem in many countries and disrupted sleep patterns are an increasingly common part of modern life. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and sleep rebound (RB) on malarial parasite infection in mice. After PSD, one group was immediately infected with parasites (PSD). The two other PSD rebound groups were allowed to sleep normally for either 24 h (24 h RB) or 48 h (48 h RB). After the recovery periods, mice were inoculated with parasites. The PSD group was the most affected by parasites presenting the higher death rate (0.02), higher number of infected cells (p < 0.01), and decrease in body weight (p < 0.04) compared to control and 48 h RB groups. The 24 h RB group was also different from control group in survival (p < 0.03), number of infected cells (p < 0.05) and body weight (p < 0.04). After 48 hours of sleep rebound animals were allowed to restore their response to parasitic infection similar to normal sleep animals. These results suggest that PSD is damaging to the immune system and leads to an increased infection severity of malaria parasites; only 48 hours of recovery sleep was sufficient to return the mice infection response to baseline values.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 26%
Other 3 11%
Student > Master 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Neuroscience 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 8 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 October 2019.
All research outputs
#1,498,101
of 21,124,412 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#279
of 5,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,596
of 244,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,124,412 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,297 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,319 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them