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An experimental method to study emissions from heated tobacco between 100-200°C

Overview of attention for article published in Chemistry Central Journal, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

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40 Mendeley
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Title
An experimental method to study emissions from heated tobacco between 100-200°C
Published in
Chemistry Central Journal, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13065-015-0096-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark Forster, Chuan Liu, Martin G Duke, Kevin G McAdam, Christopher J Proctor

Abstract

Cigarette smoke emissions are mainly produced by distillation, pyrolysis and combustion reactions when the tobacco is burnt. Some studies have shown that heating tobacco to temperatures below pyrolysis and combustion temperatures has the potential to reduce or eliminate some toxicants found in cigarette smoke. In this study, we designed a bench-top tube furnace that heats tobacco between 100-200°C and systematically studied the effects of heating temperatures on selected gas phase and aerosol phase compounds using an ISO machine-smoking protocol. Among a list of target chemical compounds, seven toxicants (nicotine, carbon monoxide, acetaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, formaldehyde, NNN and NNK) were quantifiable but not at all temperatures examined. The levels of the compounds generally displayed an increasing trend with increasing temperatures. The observed carbon monoxide and aldehydes represented the initial thermal breakdown products from the tobacco constituents. Water was the largest measured component in the total aerosol phase collected and appeared to be mainly released by evaporation; nicotine release characteristics were consistent with bond breaking and evaporation. Quantifiable levels of NNK and NNN were thought to be the result of evaporative transfer from the tobacco blend. These results demonstrate the practical utility of this tool to study low-temperature toxicant formation and emission from heated tobacco. Between 100 to 200°C, nicotine and some cigarette smoke compounds were released as a result of evaporative transfer or initial thermal decomposition from the tobacco blend.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 13%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 7 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 13%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 11 28%
Unknown 10 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2021.
All research outputs
#5,324,715
of 20,233,537 outputs
Outputs from Chemistry Central Journal
#155
of 588 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,918
of 242,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemistry Central Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,233,537 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 588 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them