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Admixture, evolution, and variation in reproductive isolation in the Boechera puberula clade

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)

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13 tweeters

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Title
Admixture, evolution, and variation in reproductive isolation in the Boechera puberula clade
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1173-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martin P. Schilling, Zachariah Gompert, Fay-Wei Li, Michael D. Windham, Paul G. Wolf

Abstract

Hybridization is very common in plants, and the incorporation of new alleles into existing lineages (i.e. admixture) can blur species boundaries. However, admixture also has the potential to increase standing genetic variation. With new sequencing methods, we can now study admixture and reproductive isolation at a much finer scale than in the past. The genus Boechera is an extraordinary example of admixture, with over 400 hybrid derivates of varying ploidy levels. Yet, few studies have assessed admixture in this genus on a genomic scale. In this study, we used Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) to clarify the evolution of the Boechera puberula clade, whose six members are scattered across the western United States. We further assessed patterns of admixture and reproductive isolation within the group, including two additional species (B. stricta and B. retrofracta) that are widespread across North America. Based on 14,815 common genetic variants, we found evidence for some cases of hybridization. We find evidence of both recent and more ancient admixture, and that levels of admixture vary across species. We present evidence for a monophyletic origin of the B. puberula group, and a split of B. puberula into two subspecies. Further, when inferring reproductive isolation on the basis of presence and absence of admixture, we found that the accumulation of reproductive isolation between species does not seem to occur linearly with time since divergence in this system. We discuss our results in the context of sexuality and asexuality in Boechera.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 29%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 17%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Professor 2 8%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 33%
Unspecified 2 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,572,055
of 20,419,783 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#887
of 2,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,752
of 294,808 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,419,783 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
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