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Total testosterone and neuropsychiatric symptoms in elderly men with Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Total testosterone and neuropsychiatric symptoms in elderly men with Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
Alzheimer's Research & Therapy, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13195-015-0107-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

James R Hall, April R Wiechmann, Rebecca L Cunningham, Leigh A Johnson, Melissa Edwards, Robert C Barber, Meharvan Singh, Scott Winter, Sid E O’Bryant

Abstract

There has been a significant increase in the use of testosterone in aging men, but little investigation into its impact on men with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The findings of the few studies that have been done are inconsistent. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between total testosterone (TT) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in a well-characterized sample of elderly men with mild to moderate AD. The sample, which was drawn from the Texas Alzheimer's Research Care Consortium Longitudinal Research Cohort, included 87 men who met the criteria for mild to moderate AD. The occurrence of NPS was gathered from caregivers and/or family members with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. TT was analyzed, and the sample was divided into a low-testosterone group (TT ≤2.5 ng/ml; n = 44) and a borderline/normal group (TT ≥2.6 ng/ml; n = 43). TT was correlated with symptoms of hallucinations, delusions, agitation, irritability and motor activity. The borderline/normal group was significantly more likely to have hallucinations (odds ratio (OR) = 5.56), delusions (OR = 3.87), motor activity (OR = 3.13) and irritability (OR = 2.77) than the low-testosterone group. Health status and apolipoprotein E ε4 status were not significant factors. The findings of the present study have implications for the use of testosterone replacement therapy in men with AD or the prodromal stage of the disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 12 24%
Unknown 16 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 18%
Psychology 7 14%
Neuroscience 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Unspecified 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 17 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 May 2015.
All research outputs
#2,440,816
of 22,803,211 outputs
Outputs from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#557
of 1,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,359
of 264,364 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Alzheimer's Research & Therapy
#14
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,803,211 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,220 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,364 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.