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Pre-diagnostic concordance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines and survival in European colorectal cancer patients: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
13 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
Pre-diagnostic concordance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines and survival in European colorectal cancer patients: a cohort study
Published in
BMC Medicine, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0332-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dora Romaguera, Heather Ward, Petra A Wark, Anne-Claire Vergnaud, Petra H Peeters, Carla H van Gils, Pietro Ferrari, Veronika Fedirko, Mazda Jenab, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Laure Dossus, Laureen Dartois, Camilla Plambeck Hansen, Christina Catherine Dahm, Genevieve Buckland, María José Sánchez, Miren Dorronsoro, Carmen Navarro, Aurelio Barricarte, Timothy J Key, Antonia Trichopoulou, Christos Tsironis, Pagona Lagiou, Giovanna Masala, Valeria Pala, Rosario Tumino, Paolo Vineis, Salvatore Panico, H Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Peter D Siersema, Bodil Ohlsson, Karin Jirström, Maria Wennberg, Lena M Nilsson, Elisabete Weiderpass, Tilman Kühn, Verena Katzke, Kay-Tee Khaw, Nick J Wareham, Anne Tjønneland, Heiner Boeing, José R Quirós, Marc J Gunter, Elio Riboli, Teresa Norat

Abstract

Cancer survivors are advised to follow lifestyle recommendations on diet, physical activity, and body fatness proposed by the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer prevention. Previous studies have demonstrated that higher concordance with these recommendations measured using an index score (the WCRF/AICR score) was associated with lower cancer incidence and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between pre-diagnostic concordance with WCRF/AICR recommendations and mortality in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The association between the WCRF/AICR score (score range 0-6 in men and 0-7 in women; higher scores indicate greater concordance) assessed on average 6.4 years before diagnosis and CRC-specific (n = 872) and overall mortality (n = 1,113) was prospectively examined among 3,292 participants diagnosed with CRC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort (mean follow-up time after diagnosis 4.2 years). Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality. The HRs (95% CIs) for CRC-specific mortality among participants in the second (score range in men/women: 2.25-2.75/3.25-3.75), third (3-3.75/4-4.75), and fourth (4-6/5-7) categories of the score were 0.87 (0.72-1.06), 0.74 (0.61-0.90), and 0.70 (0.56-0.89), respectively (P for trend <0.0001), compared to participants with the lowest concordance with the recommendations (category 1 of the score: 0-2/0-3). Similar HRs for overall mortality were observed (P for trend 0.004). Meeting the recommendations on body fatness and plant food consumption were associated with improved survival among CRC cases in mutually adjusted models. Greater concordance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations on diet, physical activity, and body fatness prior to CRC diagnosis is associated with improved survival among CRC patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 107 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 14%
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 21 19%
Unknown 19 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 41%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 18%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 4%
Psychology 3 3%
Other 8 7%
Unknown 25 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2016.
All research outputs
#421,170
of 16,341,270 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#338
of 2,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,262
of 232,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,341,270 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,584 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them