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Comparing private and public transport access to diabetic health services across inner, middle, and outer suburbs of Melbourne, Australia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
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Title
Comparing private and public transport access to diabetic health services across inner, middle, and outer suburbs of Melbourne, Australia
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3079-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Madill, Hannah Badland, Suzanne Mavoa, Billie Giles-Corti

Abstract

Melbourne, Australia is experiencing rapid population growth, with much of this occurring in metropolitan outer suburban areas, also known as urban growth areas. Currently little is known about differences in travel times when using private and public transport to access primary and secondary services across Melbourne's urban growth areas. Plan Melbourne Refresh, a recent strategic land use document has called for a 20 min city, which is where essential services including primary health care, can be accessed within a 20 min journey. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major chronic condition in Australia, with some of Melbourne's growth areas having some of the highest prevalence across Australia. This study explores travel times to diabetic health care services for populations residing in inner, middle and outer suburbs of metropolitan Melbourne. Geographic information systems (GIS) software were used to map the location of selected diabetic primary and secondary health care service providers across metropolitan inner, middle, outer established, outer urban growth and outer fringe areas of Melbourne. An origin-destination matrix was used to estimate travel distances from point of origin (using a total of approximately 50,000 synthetic residential addresses) to the closest type of each diabetic health care service provider (destinations) across Melbourne. ArcGIS was used to estimate travel times for private transport and public transport; comparisons were made by area. Our study indicated increased travel times to diabetic health services for people living in Melbourne's outer growth and outer fringe areas compared with the rest of Melbourne (inner, middle and outer established). Compared with those living in inner city areas, the median time spent travelling to diabetic services was between 2.46 and 23.24 min (private motor vehicle) and 12.01 and 43.15 min (public transport) longer for those living in outer suburban areas. Irrespective of travel mode used, results indicate that those living in inner and middle suburbs of Melbourne have shorter travel times to access diabetic health services, compared with those living in outer areas of Melbourne. Private motor vehicle travel times were approximately 4 to 5 times faster than public transport modes to access diabetic health services in all areas. Those living in new urban growth communities spend considerably more time travelling to access diabetic health services - particularly specialists - than those living in established areas across Melbourne.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 15%
Student > Master 6 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 12 22%
Unknown 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 15%
Social Sciences 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 11 20%
Unknown 21 39%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2018.
All research outputs
#18,194,476
of 20,515,708 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#6,369
of 6,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#257,329
of 295,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,515,708 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,857 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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