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Selection on MHC class II supertypes in the New Zealand endemic Hochstetter’s frog

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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Readers on

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Selection on MHC class II supertypes in the New Zealand endemic Hochstetter’s frog
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0342-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mette Lillie, Catherine E Grueber, Jolene T Sutton, Robyn Howitt, Phillip J Bishop, Dianne Gleeson, Katherine Belov

Abstract

The New Zealand native frogs, family Leiopelmatidae, are among the most archaic in the world. Leiopelma hochstetteri (Hochstetter's frog) is a small, semi-aquatic frog with numerous, fragmented populations scattered across New Zealand's North Island. We characterized a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B gene (DAB) in L. hochstetteri from a spleen transcriptome, and then compared its diversity to neutral microsatellite markers to assess the adaptive genetic diversity of five populations ("evolutionarily significant units", ESUs). L. hochstetteri possessed very high MHC diversity, with 74 DAB alleles characterized. Extremely high differentiation was observed at the DAB locus, with only two alleles shared between populations, a pattern that was not reflected in the microsatellites. Clustering analysis on putative peptide binding residues of the DAB alleles indicated four functional supertypes, all of which were represented in 4 of 5 populations, albeit at different frequencies. Otawa was an exception to these observations, with only two DAB alleles present. This study of MHC diversity highlights extreme population differentiation at this functional locus. Supertype differentiation was high among populations, suggesting spatial and/or temporal variation in selection pressures. Low DAB diversity in Otawa may limit this population's adaptive potential to future pathogenic challenges.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 32%
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Master 4 12%
Other 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 56%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 18%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,619,313
of 8,801,894 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,221
of 2,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,636
of 211,611 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#33
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,801,894 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,072 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,611 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.