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Electroacupuncture inhibits weight gain in diet-induced obese rats by activating hypothalamicLKB1-AMPK signaling

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2015
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Title
Electroacupuncture inhibits weight gain in diet-induced obese rats by activating hypothalamicLKB1-AMPK signaling
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0667-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jing Xu, Liang Chen, Lewei Tang, Le Chang, Si Liu, Jinfeng Tan, Yinglong Chen, Yulan Ren, Fanrong Liang, Jin Cui

Abstract

Electroacupuncture (EA) is reported to be an effective treatment for obesity, but its mechanism is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between hypothalamic LKB1-AMPK-ACC signaling and EA. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups fed either chow (chow-fed group) or high-fat diet (HF group). After 4 weeks of feeding, obese rats in the HF group (defined as weighing 20 % or more than rats in the chow-fed group) were randomly allocated into an EA or Diet-induced obesity (DIO) group. The EA group was given EA on bilateral ST25-ST36 for 4 weeks, while the DIO group received no further intervention. Body weight of the chow-fed, DIO, and EA groups were measured weekly. mRNA and protein levels of the hypothalamic LKB1-AMPK-ACC signaling pathway were detected using real-time (RT)-PCR and western blot, respectively. After 4 weeks of EA treatment, the weight growth trend of rats in the EA group was inhibited compared with those in the DIO group. RT-PCR and western blotting showed that EA upregulated the transcription of Adenosine 5'-monophosphate -activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2), promoted protein expression of Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα1, and inhibited acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) protein expression in the hypothalamus. This study suggests that hypothalamic LKB1-AMPK-ACC signaling plays an important role in EA treatment for obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Librarian 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Unknown 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2015.
All research outputs
#15,389,473
of 19,208,681 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#2,038
of 2,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,728
of 240,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,208,681 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,996 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them