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Motivations of nursing students regarding their educational preparation for mental health nursing in Australia and the United Kingdom: a survey evaluation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Nursing, May 2015
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Title
Motivations of nursing students regarding their educational preparation for mental health nursing in Australia and the United Kingdom: a survey evaluation
Published in
BMC Nursing, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12912-015-0084-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen-leigh Edward, Philip Warelow, Stephen Hemingway, Gylo Hercelinskyj, Anthony Welch, Sue McAndrew, John Stephenson

Abstract

There has been much debate by both academics and clinical agencies about the motivations and abilities of nurse graduates to work in mental health nursing. The aim of this study was to recruit student nurses from a dedicated mental health nursing program in the United Kingdom (UK) and a comprehensive nursing program in Australia and illuminate their motivations towards considering mental health nursing as a career choice. This study comprised of two UK and four Australian Schools of Nursing within Universities. A 12 item survey was developed for the purpose of this study and was checked for face validity by experienced mental health nurses. Convenience sampling was used and 395 responses were received. The comprehensive program represented by the Australian sample, revealed a third of respondents indicated that mental health nursing was definitely not a career option, while only 8 % of the UK specialised program reported mental health nursing was not seven for them. In both groups a higher level of motivation to work in mental health emanated from personal experience and/or work experience/exposure to mental health care. A greater focus on clinical exposure in comprehensive programs could enhance professional experience needed to increase student motivations for mental health nursing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 14 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 24 41%
Psychology 4 7%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 19 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 May 2015.
All research outputs
#3,579,590
of 5,098,139 outputs
Outputs from BMC Nursing
#180
of 212 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#117,807
of 163,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Nursing
#15
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,098,139 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 212 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 163,432 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.