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Effects of phthalate exposure on asthma may be mediated through alterations in DNA methylation

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, March 2015
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Title
Effects of phthalate exposure on asthma may be mediated through alterations in DNA methylation
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13148-015-0060-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

I-Jen Wang, Wilfried JJ Karmaus, Su-Lien Chen, John W Holloway, Susan Ewart

Abstract

Phthalates may increase the asthma risk in children. Mechanisms underlying this association remain to be addressed. This study assesses the effect of phthalate exposures on epigenetic changes and the role of epigenetic changes for asthma. In the first step, urine and blood samples from 256 children of the Childhood Environment and Allergic diseases Study (CEAS) were analyzed. Urine 5OH-MEHP levels were quantified as an indicator of exposure, and asthma information was collected. DNA methylation (DNA-M) was measured by quantitative PCR. In the screening part of step 1, DNA-M of 21 potential human candidate genes suggested by a toxicogenomic data were investigated in 22 blood samples. Then, in the testing part of step 1, positively screened genes were tested in a larger sample of 256 children and then validated by protein measurements. In step 2, we replicated the association between phthalate exposure and gene-specific DNA-M in 54 children in the phthalate contaminated food event. In step 3, the risk of DNA-M for asthma was tested in 256 children from CEAS and corroborated in 270 children from the Isle of Wight (IOW) birth cohort. Differential methylation in three genes (AR, TNFα, and IL-4) was identified through screening. Testing in 256 children showed that methylation of the TNFα gene promoter was lower when children had higher urine 5OH-MEHP values (β = -0.138, P = 0.040). Functional validation revealed that TNFα methylation was inversely correlated with TNFα protein levels (β = -0.18, P = 0.041). In an additional sample of 54 children, we corroborated that methylation of the TNFα gene promoter was lower when urine 5OH-MEHP concentrations were higher. Finally, we found that a lower methylation of 5'CGI region of TNFα was associated with asthma in 256 CEAS children (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.01 to 4.62). We replicated this in 270 children from the IOW birth cohort study. Methylation of the CpG site cg10717214 was negatively associated with asthma, when children had 'AA' or 'AG' genotype of the TNFα single nucleotide rs1800610. Effects of phthalate exposure on asthma may be mediated through alterations in DNA methylation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Environmental Science 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 12 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,496,393
of 12,434,754 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#399
of 582 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,871
of 230,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#17
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,434,754 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 582 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,204 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.