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Study of plants traditionally used in public and animal health management in Seharti Samre District, Southern Tigray, Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, March 2015
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Title
Study of plants traditionally used in public and animal health management in Seharti Samre District, Southern Tigray, Ethiopia
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13002-015-0015-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Solomon Araya, Balcha Abera, Mirutse Giday

Abstract

In Ethiopia, medicinal plants have continued to play vital role in fulfilling human and livestock healthcare needs of different communities. However, these valuable resources are being depleted mainly due to agricultural expansion and deforestation. Therefore, immediate action is required to conserve these resources and document the associated knowledge. The purpose of this study was, thus, to document and analyze information associated with medicinal plants that are used in managing public and animal health problems in Seharti Samre District, Southern Tigray, Ethiopia. Ethnobotanical data were collected from July 1, 2011 to December 30, 201 mainly using semi-structured interviews with informants sampled using purposive sampling technique and through field observations. The study revealed the use of 90 medicinal plant species in Seharti Samre District for the treatment of several human and livestock diseases. The plants belonged to 46 families and 82 genera. The majority of the medicinal plants were indicated to be harvested from the wild. Leaf was the most frequently harvested plant part accounting for 44% of the reported plants, followed by roots (16%), whole plants (10%) and seeds (8%). The most widely used method of preparation was crushing (37%), pounding (15%) and chewing (13%). Most medicinal plants were applied internally (64.6%), followed by external application on the skin (35.4%). Febrile illness is the disease group in the study area that scored the highest ICF value (0.97), followed by cardio-vascular problems (0.97) and evil eye (0.95). Different preference ranking exercises were also used to determine the most preferred and potential medicinal plants in the study area. In Seharti Samre District, medicinal plants are still playing important role in the management of various human and livestock diseases, many of which are harvested for their leaf parts. However, activities of claimed medicinal plants need to be evaluated before recommending them for their wider use. Evaluation priority should be given to medicinal plants with the highest informant agreement as such plants are believed to have better activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 119 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 13%
Student > Master 15 13%
Researcher 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Postgraduate 9 8%
Other 30 25%
Unknown 29 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 16%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 8%
Unspecified 6 5%
Chemistry 5 4%
Other 36 30%
Unknown 36 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 April 2015.
All research outputs
#20,273,512
of 22,805,349 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#661
of 734 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,130
of 261,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#14
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,805,349 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 734 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,521 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.