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Gradient Spin Echo (GraSE) imaging for fast myocardial T2 mapping

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), February 2015
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Title
Gradient Spin Echo (GraSE) imaging for fast myocardial T2 mapping
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12968-015-0127-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alois M Sprinkart, Julian A Luetkens, Frank Träber, Jonas Doerner, Jürgen Gieseke, Bernhard Schnackenburg, Georg Schmitz, Daniel Thomas, Rami Homsi, Wolfgang Block, Hans Schild, Claas P Naehle

Abstract

Quantitative Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) techniques have gained high interest in CMR research. Myocardial T2 mapping is thought to be helpful in diagnosis of acute myocardial conditions associated with myocardial edema. In this study we aimed to establish a technique for myocardial T2 mapping based on gradient-spin-echo (GraSE) imaging. The local ethics committee approved this prospective study. Written informed consent was obtained from all subjects prior to CMR. A modified GraSE sequence allowing for myocardial T2 mapping in a single breath-hold per slice using ECG-triggered acquisition of a black blood multi-echo series was developed at 1.5 Tesla. Myocardial T2 relaxation time (T2-RT) was determined by maximum likelihood estimation from magnitude phased-array multi-echo data. Four GraSE sequence variants with varying number of acquired echoes and resolution were evaluated in-vitro and in 20 healthy volunteers. Inter-study reproducibility was assessed in a subset of five volunteers. The sequence with the best overall performance was further evaluated by assessment of intra- and inter-observer agreement in all volunteers, and then implemented into the clinical CMR protocol of five patients with acute myocardial injury (myocarditis, takotsubo cardiomyopathy and myocardial infarction). In-vitro studies revealed the need for well defined sequence settings to obtain accurate T2-RT measurements with GraSE. An optimized 6-echo GraSE sequence yielded an excellent agreement with the gold standard Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. Global myocardial T2 relaxation times in healthy volunteers was 52.2 ± 2.0 ms (mean ± standard deviation). Mean difference between repeated examinations (n = 5) was -0.02 ms with 95% limits of agreement (LoA) of [-4.7; 4.7] ms. Intra-reader and inter-reader agreement was excellent with mean differences of -0.1 ms, 95% LoA = [-1.3; 1.2] ms and 0.1 ms, 95% LoA = [-1.5; 1.6] ms, respectively (n = 20). In patients with acute myocardial injury global myocardial T2-RTs were prolonged (mean: 61.3 ± 6.7 ms). Using an optimized GraSE sequence CMR allows for robust, reliable, fast myocardial T2 mapping and quantitative tissue characterization. Clinically, the GraSE-based T2-mapping has the potential to complement qualitative CMR in patients with acute myocardial injuries.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 79 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 21%
Researcher 15 19%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Student > Master 8 10%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 10 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 41%
Engineering 13 16%
Physics and Astronomy 7 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 April 2015.
All research outputs
#4,186,463
of 5,007,431 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#316
of 428 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,188
of 169,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#28
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,007,431 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 428 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.