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The influence of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy on intestinal mucosal barrier in a porcine model for post-traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, February 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 465)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
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Title
The influence of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy on intestinal mucosal barrier in a porcine model for post-traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome
Published in
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery, February 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13019-015-0211-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ling Ni, Qiyi Chen, Ke Zhu, Jialiang Shi, Juanhong Shen, Jianfeng Gong, Tao gao, Wenkui Yu, Jieshou Li, Ning Li

Abstract

It is unclear at present whether extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy can improve intestinal mucous barrier function through increased perfusion. The present study establishes an animal model for post-traumatic acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and evaluates the effect of v-vECMO treatment on the intestinal mucosal barrier. Pulmonary contusion combined with ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in 30 piglets. The animals were randomly divided into control, model, and ECMO groups. Serum I-FABP, D-lactate, and endotoxin were measured over a 24-h period. The jejunum and colon were collected post-mortem and evaluated histopathologically. The tissue was also examined using electron microscopy, and intestinal tight junction proteins (ZO-1 and occludin) were measured after 24 h of ECMO therapy. Mortality rate and cause of death were also recorded. The serum markers evaluating the intestinal mucosal barrier deteriorated in the model group compared to the control group (p < 0.05). At 2 h, serum I-FABP, D-lactate, and endotoxin were significantly increased in the ECMO group compared to the model group (p < 0.05). At 12 h, I-FABP and D-lactate in the ECMO group dropped to model group levels. Serum D-lactate was slightly lower in the ECMO group (p > 0.05) and serum I-FABP was significantly lower than in the model group (p < 0.05) at 24 h. Similarly, serum endotoxin was slightly lower in the ECMO group than in the model group (p > 0.05) at 24 h. After 24 h of ECMO therapy, the occludin and ZO-1 protein concentrations in jejunum and colon mucosa increased moderately compared to that in the model group (p < 0.05). Morphologic structure of the jejunum and colon did not improved significantly after ECMO therapy. Finally, we observed that ECMO therapy moderately decreased mortality (25% vs. 50%). Intestinal mucosal barrier continued to deteriorate in the model group. Although early ECMO therapy aggravates intestinal mucosal injury, the damage gradually improves later during therapy. The results show that ECMO therapy has a protective effect on the intestinal mucosal barrier in the later treatment stage.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 1 4%
Unknown 23 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 25%
Student > Master 5 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 54%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 5 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 February 2015.
All research outputs
#2,012,250
of 12,786,466 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
#17
of 465 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,185
of 232,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,786,466 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 465 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 232,111 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them