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Are associations between electronic media use and BMI different across levels of physical activity?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
81 Mendeley
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Title
Are associations between electronic media use and BMI different across levels of physical activity?
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1810-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ole Melkevik, Ellen Haug, Mette Rasmussen, Anne Siri Fismen, Bente Wold, Alberto Borraccino, Erik Sigmund, Robert Balazsi, Jens Bucksch, Jo Inchley, Margarida Gaspar de Matos, Oddrun Samdal

Abstract

The use of electronic media has been found to be a risk factor for higher BMI and for being overweight. Physical activity has been found to be associated with lower BMI and lower risk for being overweight. Little is known about whether the associations between physical activity and electronic media use are additive or interactive in predicting BMI and risk for overweight among adolescents. The data used in this study stem from the 2009/2010 survey of "Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study: A WHO Cross-National Survey. The sample consisted of 107184 13 and 15 year students from 30 different countries. Multilevel regression models were used to produce the presented estimates. Overall, 18% of boys and 11% of girls were classified as overweight. EM use was found to be associated with increased BMI z-scores and odds for overweight among both boys and girls who did not comply with physical activity guidelines. Among physically active adolescents, EM was found to be significantly associated with BMI or odds for overweight among girls, but not among boys. While the usage of EM appear to be inconsequential for BMI and the risk of overweight among physically active boys, we find evidence indicating that EM use is associated with BMI and risk for overweight among girls, including those who report complying with MVPA guidelines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
Unknown 80 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 18 22%
Unknown 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 16%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Psychology 4 5%
Sports and Recreations 4 5%
Other 15 19%
Unknown 23 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,602,950
of 8,691,675 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,048
of 7,178 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,116
of 221,779 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#90
of 246 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,691,675 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,178 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,779 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 246 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.