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Expression of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in the midgut of sugar-feeding female Anopheles aquasalis

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, May 2015
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Title
Expression of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in the midgut of sugar-feeding female Anopheles aquasalis
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0908-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Geovane Dias-Lopes, Andre Borges-Veloso, Leonardo Saboia-Vahia, Gilberto B. Domont, Constança Britto, Patricia Cuervo, Jose Batista De Jesus

Abstract

Anopheles aquasalis is a dipteran of the family Culicidae that is widely distributed in the coastal regions of South and Central America. This species acts as a vector of Plasmodium vivax, an important etiological agent of malaria, which represents a serious public health problem. In mosquitoes, trypsin-like serine proteases are important in blood meal digestion, immune responses and reproductive functions. The study of peptidases expressed in the mosquito midgut is essential to understanding the mechanisms of parasite-host interaction and the physiological process of nutrient digestion. Our study aimed to identify and characterize the proteolytic activities in the midgut of sugar-fed An. aquasalis females using zymographic analyses (substrate-SDS-PAGE), in-solution assays and mass spectrometry. Here, we used a zymographic analysis to further biochemically characterize the proteolytic profile of the midgut of sugar-feeding An. aquasalis females. The trypsin peptidases migrated between ~17 and ~76 kDa and displayed higher proteolytic activities between pH 7.5 and 10 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 50 °C. Four putative trypsin-like serine peptidases were identified using mass spectrometry and data mining. The molecular masses of these peptidases were similar to those observed using zymography, which suggested that these peptidases could be responsible for some of the observed proteolytic bands. Taken together, our results contribute to the gene annotation of the unknown genome of this species, to the tissue location of these peptidases, and to the functional prediction of these crucial enzymes, which all impact further studies of this species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 18%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 15%
Computer Science 4 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 9%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2015.
All research outputs
#4,294,624
of 5,165,331 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,287
of 1,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,913
of 172,831 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#88
of 108 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,587 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 108 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.