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Childhood cancer mortality in Japan, 1980–2013

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Childhood cancer mortality in Japan, 1980–2013
Published in
BMC Cancer, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12885-015-1472-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Limin Yang, Junichiro Fujimoto

Abstract

This study aimed to provide an updated analysis of childhood cancer mortality rates and long-term trends to 2013 to describe the current level of deaths and identify changes in recent decades. Data on number of deaths from cancer in children aged under 15 years were derived from Vital Statistics in Japan and the World Health Organization (WHO) mortality database for comparison countries. Trends in mortality were examined by fitting a joinpoint regression model. For all cancers combined, the mortality rate during 2010-2013 was 19.9 per 1,000,000 population for boys and 17.5 for girls in Japan. Mortality from all cancers combined decreased significantly from 1980 to 2003 for boys and from 1980 to 2001 for girls. Afterwards, the rates remained stable for both sexes. Mortality from leukemia declined over the entire study period by 4.6 % per year (p <0.05) in boys and 4.3 % per year (p <0.05) in girls. For central nervous system (CNS) tumors, a slight increase in mortality was observed for both sexes, with a statistically significant annual percent change (APC) of 0.5 % (p <0.05) for boys and 0.6 % (p <0.05) for girls. We provided updated information on recent trends of childhood cancer death. The establishment of a nationwide, childhood cancer registry is required in Japan. Moreover, trends in cancer mortality should be monitored continuously.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 32%
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Student > Master 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 55%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,130,917
of 5,168,589 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#720
of 2,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,987
of 174,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#67
of 213 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,168,589 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 57th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,851 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 174,281 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 213 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.