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Evaluation of a training program of hypertension for accredited social health activists (ASHA) in rural India

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
217 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluation of a training program of hypertension for accredited social health activists (ASHA) in rural India
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3140-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marwa Abdel-All, Amanda Gay Thrift, Michaela Riddell, Kavumpurathu Raman Thankappan Thankappan, Gomathyamma Krishnakurup Mini, Clara K. Chow, Pallab Kumar Maulik, Ajay Mahal, Rama Guggilla, Kartik Kalyanram, Kamakshi Kartik, Oduru Suresh, Roger George Evans, Brian Oldenburg, Nihal Thomas, Rohina Joshi

Abstract

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a leading cause of premature death and disability in India. Since access to health services is poor in rural India and Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) are available throughout India for maternal and child health, a potential solution for improving hypertension control is by utilising this available workforce. We aimed to develop and implement a training package for ASHAs to identify and control hypertension in the community, and evaluate the effectiveness of the training program using the Kirkpatrick Evaluation Model. The training program was part of a cluster randomised feasibility trial of a 3-month intervention to improve hypertension outcomes in South India. Training materials incorporated details on managing hypertension, goal setting, facilitating group meetings, and how to measure blood pressure and weight. The 15 ASHAs attended a five-day training workshop that was delivered using interactive instructional strategies. ASHAs then led community-based education support groups for 3 months. Training was evaluated using Kirkpatrick's evaluation model for measuring reactions, learning, behaviour and results using tests on knowledge at baseline, post-training and post-intervention, observation of performance during meetings and post-intervention interviews. The ASHAs' knowledge of hypertension improved from a mean score of 64% at baseline to 76% post-training and 84% after the 3-month intervention. Research officers, who observed the community meetings, reported that ASHAs delivered the self-management content effectively without additional assistance. The ASHAs reported that the training materials were easy to understand and useful in educating community members. ASHAs can be trained to lead community-based group educational discussions and support individuals for the management of high blood pressure. The feasibility trial is registered with the Clinical Trials Registry - India (CTRI) CTRI/2016/02/006678 (25/02/2016).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 217 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 217 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 32 15%
Researcher 25 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 7%
Student > Bachelor 16 7%
Other 46 21%
Unknown 61 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 50 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 42 19%
Social Sciences 14 6%
Neuroscience 5 2%
Engineering 4 2%
Other 29 13%
Unknown 73 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 July 2019.
All research outputs
#1,397,967
of 21,641,872 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#462
of 7,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,313
of 297,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,641,872 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,207 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,254 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them