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Comprehensive analyses of the BES1 gene family in Brassica napus and examination of their evolutionary pattern in representative species

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, May 2018
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3 tweeters

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Title
Comprehensive analyses of the BES1 gene family in Brassica napus and examination of their evolutionary pattern in representative species
Published in
BMC Genomics, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4744-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaoming Song, Xiao Ma, Chunjin Li, Jingjing Hu, Qihang Yang, Tong Wang, Li Wang, Jinpeng Wang, Di Guo, Weina Ge, Zhenyi Wang, Miaomiao Li, Qiumei Wang, Tianzeng Ren, Shuyan Feng, Lixia Wang, Weimeng Zhang, Xiyin Wang

Abstract

The BES1 gene family, an important class of plant-specific transcription factors, play key roles in the BR signal pathway in plants, regulating various development processes. Until now, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the BES1 gene family in Brassica napus, and a cross-genome exploration of their origin, copy number changes, and functional innovation in plants was also not available. We identified 28 BES1 genes in B. napus from its two subgenomes (AA and CC). We found that 71.43% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization, and their gene expression showed a prominent subgenome bias in the roots. Additionally, we identified 104 BES1 genes in another 18 representative angiosperms and performed a comparative analysis with B. napus, including evolutionary trajectory, gene duplication, positive selection, and expression pattern. Exploiting the available genome datasets, we performed a large-scale analysis across plants and algae suggested that the BES1 gene family could have originated from group F, expanding to form other groups (A to E) by duplicating or alternatively deleting some domains. We detected an additional domain containing M4 to M8 in exclusively groups F1 and F2. We found evidence that whole-genome duplication (WGD) contributed the most to the expansion of this gene family among examined dicots, while dispersed duplication contributed the most to expansion in certain monocots. Moreover, we inferred that positive selection might have occurred on major phylogenetic nodes during the evolution of plants. Grossly, a cross-genome comparative analysis of the BES1 genes in B. napus and other species sheds light on understanding its copy number expansion, natural selection, and functional innovation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 29%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Researcher 2 8%
Lecturer 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 9 38%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 29%
Unknown 10 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2018.
All research outputs
#7,792,483
of 12,923,750 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,395
of 7,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,899
of 269,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#9
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,923,750 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,593 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,952 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.