↓ Skip to main content

Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder: summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 614)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
23 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
307 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
612 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Sex and gender differences in autism spectrum disorder: summarizing evidence gaps and identifying emerging areas of priority
Published in
Molecular Autism, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13229-015-0019-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alycia K Halladay, Somer Bishop, John N Constantino, Amy M Daniels, Katheen Koenig, Kate Palmer, Daniel Messinger, Kevin Pelphrey, Stephan J Sanders, Alison Tepper Singer, Julie Lounds Taylor, Peter Szatmari

Abstract

One of the most consistent findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) research is a higher rate of ASD diagnosis in males than females. Despite this, remarkably little research has focused on the reasons for this disparity. Better understanding of this sex difference could lead to major advancements in the prevention or treatment of ASD in both males and females. In October of 2014, Autism Speaks and the Autism Science Foundation co-organized a meeting that brought together almost 60 clinicians, researchers, parents, and self-identified autistic individuals. Discussion at the meeting is summarized here with recommendations on directions of future research endeavors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 612 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 608 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 106 17%
Student > Bachelor 100 16%
Student > Master 97 16%
Researcher 68 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 63 10%
Other 87 14%
Unknown 91 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 191 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 78 13%
Neuroscience 55 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 6%
Social Sciences 29 5%
Other 108 18%
Unknown 117 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 83. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 September 2021.
All research outputs
#338,565
of 19,140,651 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#35
of 614 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,648
of 243,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,140,651 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 614 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,091 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them