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Characterization of glutathione transferases involved in the pathogenicity of Alternaria brassicicola

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, June 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

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3 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Characterization of glutathione transferases involved in the pathogenicity of Alternaria brassicicola
Published in
BMC Microbiology, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0462-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benoit Calmes, Mélanie Morel-Rouhier, Nelly Bataillé-Simoneau, Eric Gelhaye, Thomas Guillemette, Philippe Simoneau

Abstract

Glutathione transferases (GSTs) represent an extended family of multifunctional proteins involved in detoxification processes and tolerance to oxidative stress. We thus anticipated that some GSTs could play an essential role in the protection of fungal necrotrophs against plant-derived toxic metabolites and reactive oxygen species that accumulate at the host-pathogen interface during infection. Mining the genome of the necrotrophic Brassica pathogen Alternaria brassicicola for glutathione transferase revealed 23 sequences, 17 of which could be clustered into the main classes previously defined for fungal GSTs and six were 'orphans'. Five isothiocyanate-inducible GSTs from five different classes were more thoroughly investigated. Analysis of their catalytic properties revealed that two GSTs, belonging to the GSTFuA and GTT1 classes, exhibited GSH transferase activity with isothiocyanates (ITC) and peroxidase activity with cumene hydroperoxide, respectively. Mutant deficient for these two GSTs were however neither more susceptible to ITC nor less aggressive than the wild-type parental strain. By contrast mutants deficient for two other GSTs, belonging to the Ure2pB and GSTO classes, were distinguished by their hyper-susceptibility to ITC and low aggressiveness against Brassica oleracea. In particular AbGSTO1 could participate in cell tolerance to ITC due to its glutathione-dependent thioltransferase activity. The fifth ITC-inducible GST belonged to the MAPEG class and although it was not possible to produce the soluble active form of this protein in a bacterial expression system, the corresponding deficient mutant failed to develop normal symptoms on host plant tissues. Among the five ITC-inducible GSTs analyzed in this study, three were found essential for full aggressiveness of A. brassicicola on host plant. This, to our knowledge is the first evidence that GSTs might be essential virulence factors for fungal necrotrophs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 44 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 28%
Student > Master 9 20%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 61%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 24%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Chemistry 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,113,917
of 7,216,446 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#469
of 1,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,304
of 223,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#14
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,216,446 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,246 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,157 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.