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Bullous scabies: a case report and review of the literature

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, June 2015
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Title
Bullous scabies: a case report and review of the literature
Published in
BMC Research Notes, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1146-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Muhammad Arslan Arif Maan, Muhammad Soban Arif Maan, Abdul Malik Amir Humza Sohail, Muhammad Arif

Abstract

Scabies is a common parasitic infection caused by the mite Sarcoptes Scabiei. About 300 million cases of scabies are reported annually. Scabies usually presents clinically with an erythematous excoriated papulovesicular rash, burrows, nodules and hyperkeratotic lesions in specific body areas. A rare presentation of scabies is the bullous pemphigoid-like bullous scabies. So far, to the best of our knowledge, only 32 cases of bullous scabies have been reported in medical literature, of which only 11 were under 60 years of age at the time of initial presentation. This is the first case of bullous scabies being reported from Pakistan. Herein we discuss, with reference to the existing literature, the case of a 23-year-old Punjabi male who presented with a 3 day history of a tense, non-erythematous, non-tender bulla measuring approximately 0.5 cm x 0.8 cm on the right foot near the interdigital cleft. He was diagnosed to have bullous scabies. The diagnosis of scabies should be considered in all patients who present with tense bullous lesions accompanied by pruritus and a maculopapular rash. This is particularly relevant if these lesions do not resolve with steroid treatment. In such patients, in order to prevent a misdiagnosis of bullous pemphigoid, scrapings for Sarcoptes Scabiei mites and eggs should be taken.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Postgraduate 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Other 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 55%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Unknown 6 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2015.
All research outputs
#4,377,672
of 5,258,442 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,344
of 1,667 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,993
of 185,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#57
of 71 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.