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Social value of a nutritional counselling and support program for breastfeeding in urban poor settings, Nairobi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
2 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
200 Mendeley
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Title
Social value of a nutritional counselling and support program for breastfeeding in urban poor settings, Nairobi
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5334-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Goudet, Paula L. Griffiths, Caroline W. Wainaina, Teresia N. Macharia, Frederick M. Wekesah, Milka Wanjohi, Peter Muriuki, Elizabeth Kimani-Murage

Abstract

In Kenya, poor maternal nutrition, suboptimal infant and young child feeding practices and high levels of malnutrition have been shown among the urban poor. An intervention aimed at promoting optimal maternal infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN) practices in urban poor settings in Nairobi, Kenya was implemented. The intervention involved home-based counselling of pregnant and breastfeeding women and mothers of young children by community health volunteers (CHVs) on optimal MIYCN practices. This study assesses the social impact of the intervention using a Social Return on Investment (SROI) approach. Data collection was based on SROI methods and used a mixed methods approach (focus group discussions, key informant interviews, in-depth interviews, quantitative stakeholder surveys, and revealed preference approach for outcomes using value games). The SROI analysis revealed that the MIYCN intervention was assessed to be highly effective and created social value, particularly for mothers and their children. Positive changes that participants experienced included mothers being more confident in child care and children and mothers being healthier. Overall, the intervention had a negative social impact on daycare centers and on health care providers, by putting too much pressure on them to provide care without providing extra support. The study calculated that, after accounting for discounting factors, the input ($USD 419,716) generated $USD 8 million of social value at the end of the project. The net present value created by the project was estimated at $USD 29.5 million. $USD 1 invested in the project was estimated to bring USD$ 71 (sensitivity analysis: USD$ 34-136) of social value for the stakeholders. The MIYCN intervention showed an important social impact in which mothers and children benefited the most. The intervention resulted in better perceived health of mothers and children and increased confidence of mothers to provide care for their children, while it resulted in negative impacts for day care center owners and health care providers.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 200 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 9%
Student > Bachelor 16 8%
Researcher 14 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 38 19%
Unknown 74 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 52 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 14%
Social Sciences 16 8%
Psychology 5 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Other 21 11%
Unknown 74 37%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2023.
All research outputs
#1,543,221
of 24,318,236 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,705
of 16,033 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,295
of 332,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#48
of 312 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,318,236 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 16,033 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 312 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.