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Optimized inorganic carbon regime for enhanced growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, June 2015
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Title
Optimized inorganic carbon regime for enhanced growth and lipid accumulation in Chlorella vulgaris
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13068-015-0265-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Egan J Lohman, Robert D Gardner, Todd Pedersen, Brent M Peyton, Keith E Cooksey, Robin Gerlach

Abstract

Large-scale algal biofuel production has been limited, among other factors, by the availability of inorganic carbon in the culture medium at concentrations higher than achievable with atmospheric CO2. Life cycle analyses have concluded that costs associated with supplying CO2 to algal cultures are significant contributors to the overall energy consumption. A two-phase optimal growth and lipid accumulation scenario is presented, which (1) enhances the growth rate and (2) the triacylglyceride (TAG) accumulation rate in the oleaginous Chlorophyte Chlorella vulgaris strain UTEX 395, by growing the organism in the presence of low concentrations of NaHCO3 (5 mM) and controlling the pH of the system with a periodic gas sparge of 5 % CO2 (v/v). Once cultures reached the desired cell densities, which can be "fine-tuned" based on initial nutrient concentrations, cultures were switched to a lipid accumulation metabolism through the addition of 50 mM NaHCO3. This two-phase approach increased the specific growth rate of C. vulgaris by 69 % compared to cultures sparged continuously with 5 % CO2 (v/v); further, biomass productivity (g L(-1) day(-1)) was increased by 27 %. Total biodiesel potential [assessed as total fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) produced] was increased from 53.3 to 61 % (FAME biomass(-1)) under the optimized conditions; biodiesel productivity (g FAME L(-1) day(-1)) was increased by 7.7 %. A bicarbonate salt screen revealed that American Chemical Society (ACS) and industrial grade NaHCO3 induced the highest TAG accumulation (% w/w), whereas Na2CO3 did not induce significant TAG accumulation. NH4HCO3 had a negative effect on cell health presumably due to ammonia toxicity. The raw, unrefined form of trona, NaHCO3∙Na2CO3 (sodium sesquicarbonate) induced TAG accumulation, albeit to a slightly lower extent than the more refined forms of sodium bicarbonate. The strategic addition of sodium bicarbonate was found to enhance growth and lipid accumulation rates in cultures of C. vulgaris, when compared to traditional culturing strategies, which rely on continuously sparging algal cultures with elevated concentrations of CO2(g). This work presents a two-phased, improved photoautotrophic growth and lipid accumulation approach, which may result in an overall increase in algal biofuel productivity.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Unknown 133 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 21%
Researcher 12 9%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 25 19%
Unknown 21 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 10%
Environmental Science 10 7%
Engineering 9 7%
Chemical Engineering 8 6%
Other 17 13%
Unknown 30 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2015.
All research outputs
#20,281,599
of 22,815,414 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#1,205
of 1,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,847
of 266,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#18
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,815,414 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,395 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.