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Human-induced pluripotent stem cells generated from intervertebral disc cells improve neurologic functions in spinal cord injury

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, June 2015
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Title
Human-induced pluripotent stem cells generated from intervertebral disc cells improve neurologic functions in spinal cord injury
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0118-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jinsoo Oh, Kang-In Lee, Hyeong-Taek Kim, Youngsang You, Do Heum Yoon, Ki Yeong Song, Eunji Cheong, Yoon Ha, Dong-Youn Hwang

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have emerged as a promising cell source for immune-compatible cell therapy. Although a variety of somatic cells have been tried for iPSC generation, it is still of great interest to test new cell types, especially those which are hardly obtainable in normal situation. In this study, we generated iPSCs using the cells originated from intervertebral disc which were removed during spinal operation after spinal cord injury. We investigated the pluripotency of disc cell-derived iPSCs (diPSCs) and neural differentiation capability as well as therapeutic effect in spinal cord injury. The disc cell-derived iPSCs (diPSCs) displayed similar characteristics to human embryonic stem cells, and were efficiently differentiated into neural precursor cells (NPCs) with the capability of differentiation into mature neurons in vitro. When the diPSC-derived NPCs were transplanted into mice 9 days after spinal cord injury, we detected a significant amelioration of hindlimb dysfunction during follow-up recovery periods. Histological analysis at 5 weeks post-transplantation identified undifferentiated human NPCs (Nestin(+)) as well as early (Tuj1(+)) and mature (MAP2(+)) neurons derived from the transplanted NPCs. Furthermore, NPC transplantation demonstrated a preventive effect on spinal cord degeneration resulting from the secondary injury. This study revealed that intervertebral discs removed during surgery for spinal stabilization after spinal cord injury, previously considered a "waste" tissue, may provide a unique opportunity to study iPSCs derived from difficult-to-access somatic cells and a useful therapeutic resource for autologous cell replacement therapy in spinal cord injury.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 30%
Student > Master 7 16%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 16%
Neuroscience 7 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2015.
All research outputs
#4,394,388
of 5,276,531 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#409
of 459 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,746
of 186,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#30
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,276,531 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 459 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,466 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.