↓ Skip to main content

Pancreatic cancer-associated gene polymorphisms in a nation-wide cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers; a case–control study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, June 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Pancreatic cancer-associated gene polymorphisms in a nation-wide cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers; a case–control study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1235-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas P Potjer, Nienke van der Stoep, Jeanine J Houwing-Duistermaat, Ingrid C A W Konings, Cora M Aalfs, Peter C van den Akker, Margreet G Ausems, Charlotte J Dommering, Lizet E van der Kolk, Merel C Maiburg, Liesbeth Spruijt, Anja Wagner, Hans F A Vasen, Frederik J Hes

Abstract

The p16-Leiden founder mutation in the CDKN2A gene is the most common cause of Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma (FAMMM) syndrome in the Netherlands. Individuals with this mutation are at increased risk for developing melanoma of the skin, as well as pancreatic cancer. However, there is a notable interfamilial variability in the occurrence of pancreatic cancer among p16-Leiden families. We aimed to test whether previously identified genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer modify the risk for pancreatic cancer in p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers. Seven pancreatic cancer-associated SNPs were selected from the literature and were genotyped in a cohort of 185 p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers from 88 families, including 50 cases (median age 55 years) with pancreatic cancer and 135 controls (median age 64 years) without pancreatic cancer. Allelic odds ratios per SNP were calculated. No significant association with pancreatic cancer was found for any of the seven SNPs. Since genetic modifiers for developing melanoma have already been identified in CDKN2A mutation carriers, this study does not exclude that genetic modifiers do not play a role in the individual pancreatic cancer risk in this cohort of p16-Leiden germline mutation carriers. The search for these modifiers should therefore continue, because they can potentially facilitate more targeted pancreatic surveillance programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 27%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2015.
All research outputs
#5,408,382
of 7,188,283 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,281
of 1,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,496
of 223,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#43
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,188,283 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,858 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.