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Should Nephrologists Take a Larger Role in Interventional Nephrology, and Should Central Line Insertion Remain a Requirement of Nephrology Residency Training? A Debate

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, April 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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12 Mendeley
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Title
Should Nephrologists Take a Larger Role in Interventional Nephrology, and Should Central Line Insertion Remain a Requirement of Nephrology Residency Training? A Debate
Published in
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40697-015-0045-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

David C Mendelssohn

Abstract

The Canadian Society of Nephrology must soon provide input concerning the future of procedural training in nephrology. While at one time, the ability to insert a central venous catheter (CVC) was an essential skill required by all nephrologists, in 2014, nephrology training and practice has changed in fundamental ways such that it would be both unreasonable, and impractical, to maintain this requirement. Indeed, survey evidence suggests that many current trainees are not achieving this competency. Amongst the reasons that this requirement should be withdrawn include: 1) Not all trainees have the procedural skills to safely learn to insert CVC's. 2) Most nephrologists in training and in practice are intellectually oriented, not procedurally oriented and are not seeking to perform lots of procedures. 3) In most practice settings, interventional radiologists and intensive care doctors perform dialysis line insertions using real time ultrasound guidance frequently, and offer timely, safer, and better service to patients. 4) Most trainees will not enter practice settings where CVC insertion ability is required. 5) Otherwise excellent future trainees may be denied a nephrology certificate of special competence only because they are unable to insert a CVC by the end of their fellowship. 6) Academic nephrology training programs that cannot provide adequate CVC insertion experience to fellows may lose their status as training centres. As a pragmatic way forward, Canadian nephrology training programs must encourage and offer only those nephrology trainees who have the ability and interest in procedural nephrology, a pathway through which they may be provided superb advanced training to become an expert. There is no longer a compelling reason to mandate this for all trainees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 25%
Unspecified 2 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 58%
Unspecified 2 17%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2017.
All research outputs
#10,361,111
of 17,654,026 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#268
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,373
of 238,741 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,654,026 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,741 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them